Common breastfeeding problems encountered in general practice

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/617508
Title:
Common breastfeeding problems encountered in general practice
Authors:
O'Donoghue, Anna
Publisher:
Nursing in General Practice
Journal:
Nursing in General Practice
Issue Date:
May-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/617508
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Breastfeeding has a major role to play in optimising public health. It promotes health and prevents disease in the short and long-term for both mother and baby. Ireland has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world and easily the lowest rate in Europe. The ‘Growing Up in Ireland’ report 2014 showed 56 per cent babies received breastmilk, 40 per cent were breastfeeding leaving hospital, but only 70 per cent of those babies were still breastfed at one month, and half were breastfed at three months.1 Sometimes breastfeeding can be challenging for both the mother and baby, but it can be successful with support and education from practice nurses and GPs, lactation consultants, public health nurses and breastfeeding support groups. The most common reasons reported for stopping breastfeeding include the mother not having enough milk, sore nipples and engorged breasts. The delivery of primary care management of these common breastfeeding problems will promote longer breastfeeding duration.
Keywords:
BREASTFEEDING; GENERAL PRACTICE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Donoghue, Annaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-26T09:17:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-26T09:17:44Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/617508-
dc.descriptionBreastfeeding has a major role to play in optimising public health. It promotes health and prevents disease in the short and long-term for both mother and baby. Ireland has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world and easily the lowest rate in Europe. The ‘Growing Up in Ireland’ report 2014 showed 56 per cent babies received breastmilk, 40 per cent were breastfeeding leaving hospital, but only 70 per cent of those babies were still breastfed at one month, and half were breastfed at three months.1 Sometimes breastfeeding can be challenging for both the mother and baby, but it can be successful with support and education from practice nurses and GPs, lactation consultants, public health nurses and breastfeeding support groups. The most common reasons reported for stopping breastfeeding include the mother not having enough milk, sore nipples and engorged breasts. The delivery of primary care management of these common breastfeeding problems will promote longer breastfeeding duration.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNursing in General Practiceen
dc.subjectBREASTFEEDINGen
dc.subjectGENERAL PRACTICEen
dc.titleCommon breastfeeding problems encountered in general practiceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNursing in General Practiceen
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