Power and influence in systemic consultation

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/608494
Title:
Power and influence in systemic consultation
Authors:
Carr, Alan
Affiliation:
University College Dublin (UCD)
Citation:
Carr, A. (2011). Power and influence in systemic consultation. Human Systems: Journal of Systemic Consultation and Management, 22, 34-48.
Publisher:
European Family Therapy Association
Journal:
Human Systems: Journal of Systemic Consultation and Management
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/608494
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The disagreement between Haley and Bateson over the usefulness of the concept of power in accounting for problems in human systems is described. Seven propositions which address the main issues raised by the Haley-Bateson debate are then set out. Finally some clinical and ethical implications of these propositions are presented. INTRODUCTION The Haley-Bateson Disagreement. Controversy over the concept of power has characterized the development of systems consultation and family therapy from the earliest days (Dell, 1989; Fish, 1990; Hoffman, 1990; Simon, 1982). It may have begun with the division between Bateson and Haley during the Double-Bind Project (Bateson, 1976; Haley, 1976).
Keywords:
FAMILY THERAPY; SYSTEMIC THERAPY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarr, Alanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-06T11:46:40Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-06T11:46:40Zen
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.citationCarr, A. (2011). Power and influence in systemic consultation. Human Systems: Journal of Systemic Consultation and Management, 22, 34-48.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/608494en
dc.descriptionThe disagreement between Haley and Bateson over the usefulness of the concept of power in accounting for problems in human systems is described. Seven propositions which address the main issues raised by the Haley-Bateson debate are then set out. Finally some clinical and ethical implications of these propositions are presented. INTRODUCTION The Haley-Bateson Disagreement. Controversy over the concept of power has characterized the development of systems consultation and family therapy from the earliest days (Dell, 1989; Fish, 1990; Hoffman, 1990; Simon, 1982). It may have begun with the division between Bateson and Haley during the Double-Bind Project (Bateson, 1976; Haley, 1976).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean Family Therapy Associationen
dc.subjectFAMILY THERAPYen
dc.subjectSYSTEMIC THERAPYen
dc.titlePower and influence in systemic consultationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Dublin (UCD)en
dc.identifier.journalHuman Systems: Journal of Systemic Consultation and Managementen
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