Electronic blood tracking system

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/605713
Title:
Electronic blood tracking system
Authors:
McEvoy, Catherine
Affiliation:
eHealth Ireland
Publisher:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Issue Date:
Jun-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/605713
Item Type:
Other
Language:
en
Description:
Over 1,000 people receive transfusions every week in Ireland. This represents a substantial amount of blood movement from the Irish Blood Transfusion Service (IBTS) to the hospitals. The need for EU and national laws covering the safety of blood transfusion arose out of the bleak events of the 1980s and 1990s where poor transfusion practices in several countries including Ireland, contributed to the spread of HIV and hepatitis in Europe and throughout the world. Creutzfeldt - Jakob disease (CJD) has also contributed significantly to the problem as currently there is no test for donors. Consequently it is necessary to have complete traceability for all blood products due to the long incubation period of the CJD prion EU Blood Directive 2002/98/EC enacted in Statutory Instrument 360 of 2005 seeks to ensure that the best practices in transfusion are adopted and available everywhere in Europe by “setting standards of quality and safety for the collection, testing, processing, storage and distribution of human blood and blood components” and covers both blood establishments and hospital blood banks. The effective date was November 2005, however the Irish government granted hospital blood banks a three year derogation for the quality system and they had to be fully compliant by November 2008. By the November 2008 deadline hospital blood banks achieved compliance using paperbased traceability systems with some hospitals further supported by electronic blood tracking systems. This case study outlines the improvements brought about by the introduction of an Electronic Blood Tracking system for Ireland.
Keywords:
ELECTRONIC RECORDS; BLOOD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcEvoy, Catherineen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-18T12:16:06Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-18T12:16:06Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/605713en
dc.descriptionOver 1,000 people receive transfusions every week in Ireland. This represents a substantial amount of blood movement from the Irish Blood Transfusion Service (IBTS) to the hospitals. The need for EU and national laws covering the safety of blood transfusion arose out of the bleak events of the 1980s and 1990s where poor transfusion practices in several countries including Ireland, contributed to the spread of HIV and hepatitis in Europe and throughout the world. Creutzfeldt - Jakob disease (CJD) has also contributed significantly to the problem as currently there is no test for donors. Consequently it is necessary to have complete traceability for all blood products due to the long incubation period of the CJD prion EU Blood Directive 2002/98/EC enacted in Statutory Instrument 360 of 2005 seeks to ensure that the best practices in transfusion are adopted and available everywhere in Europe by “setting standards of quality and safety for the collection, testing, processing, storage and distribution of human blood and blood components” and covers both blood establishments and hospital blood banks. The effective date was November 2005, however the Irish government granted hospital blood banks a three year derogation for the quality system and they had to be fully compliant by November 2008. By the November 2008 deadline hospital blood banks achieved compliance using paperbased traceability systems with some hospitals further supported by electronic blood tracking systems. This case study outlines the improvements brought about by the introduction of an Electronic Blood Tracking system for Ireland.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
dc.subjectELECTRONIC RECORDSen
dc.subjectBLOODen
dc.titleElectronic blood tracking systemen
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmenteHealth Irelanden
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