Understanding how people cope with cancer

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/596655
Title:
Understanding how people cope with cancer
Authors:
McKiernan, Aidan; Steggles, Shawn; Carr, Alan
Publisher:
The Psychological Society of Ireland
Journal:
Irish Psychologist
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/596655
Additional Links:
http://www.psychologicalsociety.ie/page/download_list/IP
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The challenges associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment require a coping response. The nature of the response can be defined according to a number of theoretical models of adjustment. Presented is a review of 3 theoretical models of adjustment applied to the cancer experience (1) The problem solving model of stress and coping (Nezu, Nezu, Houts Friedman & Faddis, 1998); (2) An integrative framework and life events model (Billings and Moos, 1982); and (3) the cognitive model (Moorey and Greer, 2002). While the problem solving model highlights the importance of problem solving processes in mediating the impact of cancer on quality of life, the integrative framework and the life events model defines the relationship between cancer and adjustment as being mediated not only by coping responses but also by the individual’s personal and environmental resources as well as their cognitive appraisal of cancer-related stresses.
Keywords:
CANCER; COPING; PSYCHOLOGICAL DETERMINANT

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcKiernan, Aidanen
dc.contributor.authorSteggles, Shawnen
dc.contributor.authorCarr, Alanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-18T15:16:16Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-18T15:16:16Zen
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/596655en
dc.descriptionThe challenges associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment require a coping response. The nature of the response can be defined according to a number of theoretical models of adjustment. Presented is a review of 3 theoretical models of adjustment applied to the cancer experience (1) The problem solving model of stress and coping (Nezu, Nezu, Houts Friedman & Faddis, 1998); (2) An integrative framework and life events model (Billings and Moos, 1982); and (3) the cognitive model (Moorey and Greer, 2002). While the problem solving model highlights the importance of problem solving processes in mediating the impact of cancer on quality of life, the integrative framework and the life events model defines the relationship between cancer and adjustment as being mediated not only by coping responses but also by the individual’s personal and environmental resources as well as their cognitive appraisal of cancer-related stresses.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Psychological Society of Irelanden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.psychologicalsociety.ie/page/download_list/IPen
dc.subjectCANCERen
dc.subjectCOPINGen
dc.subjectPSYCHOLOGICAL DETERMINANTen
dc.titleUnderstanding how people cope with canceren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Psychologisten
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