Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/596575
Title:
National Stroke Audit 2015
Authors:
McElwaine, P; McCormack, J; Harbison, J
Citation:
McElwaine, P. McCormack, J. Harbison, J. on behalf of the National Stroke Programme Audit Steering Group Irish Heart Foundation/HSE National Stroke Audit 2015 December 2015
Publisher:
Irish Heart Foundation (IHF) & Health Service Executive
Issue Date:
Feb-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/596575
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The report of first Irish National Audit of Stroke Care published in 2008 made sobering reading. The care offered to Irish people suffering stroke summarised in that document could at best be described as sub-­‐optimal and in many  parameters  assessed,  care  was  clearly  grossly  inadequate  leading  to  increased  morbidity,  mortality  and  reduced quality of life in Irish stroke survivors. The audit results laid a challenge to the Irish Health system addressed by the inclusion of stroke care in the HSE’s 2009 document, ‘Changing Cardiovascular Health: National Cardiovascular Health Policy 2010-­‐2019’ and by the launch of the National Clinical Programme for Stroke in 2010. That these initiatives were launched at almost the exact moment that the country entered the worse economic crisis  in  its  history  is  a  matter  of  historical  note  and  consequently  left  the  task  of  improving  care  much  more  challenging. Whilst the Health service was subject to an employment embargo and health expenditure contracted by more than 10%, the stroke programme was given a small resource and allowed to reappoint to a limited  number  of  vacant  posts  on  the  condition  that  they  be  used  to  improve  stroke  care.  Apart  from  these  limited resources our only option was to harness the good will of health service staff, often asking them to change  work  practices  and  undertake  new  responsibilities  without  being  able  to  offer  any  recompense  or  reward. Beyond this we undertook a programme of training, education, organisation and reorganisation of services.  In  this  process  the  only  resource  available  in  abundance  was  the  hard  work  and  enthusiasm  of  our  colleagues in the health service across the country.
Keywords:
STROKE; AUDIT
ISSN:
978-1-78602-006-2

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcElwaine, Pen
dc.contributor.authorMcCormack, Jen
dc.contributor.authorHarbison, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-17T16:26:59Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-17T16:26:59Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02en
dc.identifier.citationMcElwaine, P. McCormack, J. Harbison, J. on behalf of the National Stroke Programme Audit Steering Group Irish Heart Foundation/HSE National Stroke Audit 2015 December 2015en
dc.identifier.issn978-1-78602-006-2en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/596575en
dc.descriptionThe report of first Irish National Audit of Stroke Care published in 2008 made sobering reading. The care offered to Irish people suffering stroke summarised in that document could at best be described as sub-­‐optimal and in many  parameters  assessed,  care  was  clearly  grossly  inadequate  leading  to  increased  morbidity,  mortality  and  reduced quality of life in Irish stroke survivors. The audit results laid a challenge to the Irish Health system addressed by the inclusion of stroke care in the HSE’s 2009 document, ‘Changing Cardiovascular Health: National Cardiovascular Health Policy 2010-­‐2019’ and by the launch of the National Clinical Programme for Stroke in 2010. That these initiatives were launched at almost the exact moment that the country entered the worse economic crisis  in  its  history  is  a  matter  of  historical  note  and  consequently  left  the  task  of  improving  care  much  more  challenging. Whilst the Health service was subject to an employment embargo and health expenditure contracted by more than 10%, the stroke programme was given a small resource and allowed to reappoint to a limited  number  of  vacant  posts  on  the  condition  that  they  be  used  to  improve  stroke  care.  Apart  from  these  limited resources our only option was to harness the good will of health service staff, often asking them to change  work  practices  and  undertake  new  responsibilities  without  being  able  to  offer  any  recompense  or  reward. Beyond this we undertook a programme of training, education, organisation and reorganisation of services.  In  this  process  the  only  resource  available  in  abundance  was  the  hard  work  and  enthusiasm  of  our  colleagues in the health service across the country.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Heart Foundation (IHF) & Health Service Executiveen
dc.subjectSTROKEen
dc.subjectAUDITen
dc.titleNational Stroke Audit 2015en
dc.typeReporten
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