Which part of a short, global risk assessment, the Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community, predicts adverse healthcare outcomes?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/583475
Title:
Which part of a short, global risk assessment, the Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community, predicts adverse healthcare outcomes?
Authors:
O’Caoimh, Rónán; FitzGerald, Carol; Cronin, Una; Svendrovski, Anton; Gao, Yang; Healy, Elizabeth; O’Connell, Elizabeth; O’Keeffe, Gabrielle; O’Herlihy, Eileen; Weathers, Elizabeth; Cornally, Nicola; Leahy-Warren, Patricia; Orfila, Francesc; Paúl, Constança; Clarnette, Roger; Molloy, D. William
Citation:
Which Part of a Short, Global Risk Assessment, the Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community, Predicts Adverse Healthcare Outcomes? 2015, 2015:1 Journal of Aging Research
Publisher:
Journal of Aging Research
Journal:
Journal of Aging Research
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/583475
DOI:
10.1155/2015/256414
Additional Links:
http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jar/2015/256414/
Abstract:
The Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community (RISC) is a short, global risk assessment to identify community-dwelling older adults’ one-year risk of institutionalisation, hospitalisation, and death. We investigated the contribution that the three components of the RISC ( concern , its severity , and the ability of the caregiver network to manage concern) make to the accuracy of the instrument, across its three domains (mental state, activities of daily living (ADL), and medical state), by comparing their accuracy to other assessment instruments in the prospective Community Assessment of Risk and Treatment Strategies study. RISC scores were available for 782 patients. Across all three domains each subtest more accurately predicted institutionalisation compared to hospitalisation or death. The caregiver network’s ability to manage ADL more accurately predicted institutionalisation (AUC 0.68) compared to hospitalisation (AUC 0.57, P = 0.01 ) or death (AUC 0.59, P = 0.046 ), comparing favourably with the Barthel Index (AUC 0.67). The severity of ADL (AUC 0.63), medical state (AUC 0.62), Clinical Frailty Scale (AUC 0.67), and Charlson Comorbidity Index (AUC 0.66) scores had similar accuracy in predicting mortality. Risk of hospitalisation was difficult to predict. Thus, each component, and particularly the caregiver network , had reasonable accuracy in predicting institutionalisation. No subtest or assessment instrument accurately predicted risk of hospitalisation.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community (RISC) is a short, global risk assessment to identify community-dwelling older adults’ one-year risk of institutionalisation, hospitalisation, and death. We investigated the contribution that the three components of the RISC (concern, its severity, and the ability of the caregiver network to manage concern) make to the accuracy of the instrument, across its three domains (mental state, activities of daily living (ADL), and medical state), by comparing their accuracy to other assessment instruments in the prospective Community Assessment of Risk and Treatment Strategies study. RISC scores were available for 782 patients. Across all three domains each subtest more accurately predicted institutionalisation compared to hospitalisation or death. The caregiver network’s ability to manage ADL more accurately predicted institutionalisation (AUC 0.68) compared to hospitalisation (AUC 0.57, ) or death (AUC 0.59, ), comparing favourably with the Barthel Index (AUC 0.67). The severity of ADL (AUC 0.63), medical state (AUC 0.62), Clinical Frailty Scale (AUC 0.67), and Charlson Comorbidity Index (AUC 0.66) scores had similar accuracy in predicting mortality. Risk of hospitalisation was difficult to predict. Thus, each component, and particularly the caregiver network, had reasonable accuracy in predicting institutionalisation. No subtest or assessment instrument accurately predicted risk of hospitalisation.
Keywords:
AGEING; RISK ASSESSMENT; COMMUNITY HEALTH
ISSN:
2090-2204; 2090-2212

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO’Caoimh, Rónánen
dc.contributor.authorFitzGerald, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorCronin, Unaen
dc.contributor.authorSvendrovski, Antonen
dc.contributor.authorGao, Yangen
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorO’Connell, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorO’Keeffe, Gabrielleen
dc.contributor.authorO’Herlihy, Eileenen
dc.contributor.authorWeathers, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorCornally, Nicolaen
dc.contributor.authorLeahy-Warren, Patriciaen
dc.contributor.authorOrfila, Francescen
dc.contributor.authorPaúl, Constançaen
dc.contributor.authorClarnette, Rogeren
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, D. Williamen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-09T12:25:36Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-09T12:25:36Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationWhich Part of a Short, Global Risk Assessment, the Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community, Predicts Adverse Healthcare Outcomes? 2015, 2015:1 Journal of Aging Researchen
dc.identifier.issn2090-2204en
dc.identifier.issn2090-2212en
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2015/256414en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/583475en
dc.descriptionThe Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community (RISC) is a short, global risk assessment to identify community-dwelling older adults’ one-year risk of institutionalisation, hospitalisation, and death. We investigated the contribution that the three components of the RISC (concern, its severity, and the ability of the caregiver network to manage concern) make to the accuracy of the instrument, across its three domains (mental state, activities of daily living (ADL), and medical state), by comparing their accuracy to other assessment instruments in the prospective Community Assessment of Risk and Treatment Strategies study. RISC scores were available for 782 patients. Across all three domains each subtest more accurately predicted institutionalisation compared to hospitalisation or death. The caregiver network’s ability to manage ADL more accurately predicted institutionalisation (AUC 0.68) compared to hospitalisation (AUC 0.57, ) or death (AUC 0.59, ), comparing favourably with the Barthel Index (AUC 0.67). The severity of ADL (AUC 0.63), medical state (AUC 0.62), Clinical Frailty Scale (AUC 0.67), and Charlson Comorbidity Index (AUC 0.66) scores had similar accuracy in predicting mortality. Risk of hospitalisation was difficult to predict. Thus, each component, and particularly the caregiver network, had reasonable accuracy in predicting institutionalisation. No subtest or assessment instrument accurately predicted risk of hospitalisation.en
dc.description.abstractThe Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community (RISC) is a short, global risk assessment to identify community-dwelling older adults’ one-year risk of institutionalisation, hospitalisation, and death. We investigated the contribution that the three components of the RISC ( concern , its severity , and the ability of the caregiver network to manage concern) make to the accuracy of the instrument, across its three domains (mental state, activities of daily living (ADL), and medical state), by comparing their accuracy to other assessment instruments in the prospective Community Assessment of Risk and Treatment Strategies study. RISC scores were available for 782 patients. Across all three domains each subtest more accurately predicted institutionalisation compared to hospitalisation or death. The caregiver network’s ability to manage ADL more accurately predicted institutionalisation (AUC 0.68) compared to hospitalisation (AUC 0.57, P = 0.01 ) or death (AUC 0.59, P = 0.046 ), comparing favourably with the Barthel Index (AUC 0.67). The severity of ADL (AUC 0.63), medical state (AUC 0.62), Clinical Frailty Scale (AUC 0.67), and Charlson Comorbidity Index (AUC 0.66) scores had similar accuracy in predicting mortality. Risk of hospitalisation was difficult to predict. Thus, each component, and particularly the caregiver network , had reasonable accuracy in predicting institutionalisation. No subtest or assessment instrument accurately predicted risk of hospitalisation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJournal of Aging Researchen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hindawi.com/journals/jar/2015/256414/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Aging Researchen
dc.subjectAGEINGen
dc.subjectRISK ASSESSMENTen
dc.subjectCOMMUNITY HEALTHen
dc.titleWhich part of a short, global risk assessment, the Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community, predicts adverse healthcare outcomes?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Aging Researchen
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