Child health policy and practice in times of recession: findings from Ireland

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/582867
Title:
Child health policy and practice in times of recession: findings from Ireland
Authors:
Hanafin, Sinéad; Coyne, Imelda
Affiliation:
1Visiting Research Fellow, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin. 2Professor of Children’s Nursing and Research, School of Nursing & Midwifery,Trinity College Dublin.
Citation:
Hanafin S & Coyne I, Child health policy and practice in times of recession: Findings from Ireland, International Journal Of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing,, 2, 1, 2015, 2053 - 2377
Publisher:
Scienpress Ltd
Journal:
International Journal Of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing
Issue Date:
Sep-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/582867
Language:
en
Description:
Since 2009, Ireland has experienced a deep economic recession and despite some recent fiscal recovery, the effects of financial cutbacks continue to be felt. The recession did not impact on all individuals equally, however, and families with young children were particularly disadvantaged due to unemployment, housing problems and decreased income. This paper presents an overview of the key contribution of the public health nursing service as articulated in policy and research evidence over this time. While the implementation of the service in recent years has been hampered by challenges arising as a consequence of this recession, there is some evidence that the public health nursing service continues to have strong commitment to their work with children and families. Funding however, needs to be aligned with the explicit and stated commitments and this means ensuring the child health workforce is adequately resourced and funded to undertake this important work.
Keywords:
CHILD HEALTH; PUBLIC HEALTH; NURSE; HEALTH POLICY; FAMILY
Local subject classification:
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING; RECESSION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHanafin, Sinéaden
dc.contributor.authorCoyne, Imeldaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-30T09:27:42Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-30T09:27:42Zen
dc.date.issued2015-09en
dc.identifier.citationHanafin S & Coyne I, Child health policy and practice in times of recession: Findings from Ireland, International Journal Of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing,, 2, 1, 2015, 2053 - 2377en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/582867en
dc.descriptionSince 2009, Ireland has experienced a deep economic recession and despite some recent fiscal recovery, the effects of financial cutbacks continue to be felt. The recession did not impact on all individuals equally, however, and families with young children were particularly disadvantaged due to unemployment, housing problems and decreased income. This paper presents an overview of the key contribution of the public health nursing service as articulated in policy and research evidence over this time. While the implementation of the service in recent years has been hampered by challenges arising as a consequence of this recession, there is some evidence that the public health nursing service continues to have strong commitment to their work with children and families. Funding however, needs to be aligned with the explicit and stated commitments and this means ensuring the child health workforce is adequately resourced and funded to undertake this important work.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherScienpress Ltden
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTHen
dc.subjectNURSEen
dc.subjectHEALTH POLICYen
dc.subjectFAMILYen
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH NURSINGen
dc.subject.otherRECESSIONen
dc.titleChild health policy and practice in times of recession: findings from Irelanden
dc.contributor.department1Visiting Research Fellow, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin. 2Professor of Children’s Nursing and Research, School of Nursing & Midwifery,Trinity College Dublin.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal Of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursingen
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