The prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/582572
Title:
The prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland.
Authors:
Skerritt, Louise; Moore, Zena
Affiliation:
1Public Health Nurse/Tissue Viability Nurse, Health Service Executive, Dublin Mid-Leinster. 2Professor and Head of School of Nursing & Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland.
Citation:
The prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland. 2014, Suppl:S11-7 Br J Community Nurs
Journal:
British journal of community nursing
Issue Date:
Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/582572
PubMed ID:
24912830
Abstract:
This study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care.
Keywords:
NURSING; WOUND MANAGEMENT
Local subject classification:
WOUND CARE
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Bandages; Community Health Nursing; Female; Humans; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Pressure Ulcer; Prevalence; Risk Factors; Wounds and Injuries
ISSN:
1462-4753

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSkerritt, Louiseen
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Zenaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-24T12:07:39Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-24T12:07:39Zen
dc.date.issued2014-06en
dc.identifier.citationThe prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland. 2014, Suppl:S11-7 Br J Community Nursen
dc.identifier.issn1462-4753en
dc.identifier.pmid24912830en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/582572en
dc.descriptionThis study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care.en
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British journal of community nursingen
dc.subjectNURSINGen
dc.subjectWOUND MANAGEMENTen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshBandagesen
dc.subject.meshCommunity Health Nursingen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIrelanden
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPressure Ulceren
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshWounds and Injuriesen
dc.subject.otherWOUND CAREen
dc.titleThe prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1Public Health Nurse/Tissue Viability Nurse, Health Service Executive, Dublin Mid-Leinster. 2Professor and Head of School of Nursing & Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish journal of community nursingen

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