Relationship between obesity and the risk of clinically significant depression: Mendelian randomisation study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/582380
Title:
Relationship between obesity and the risk of clinically significant depression: Mendelian randomisation study.
Authors:
Hung, Chi-Fa; Rivera, Margarita; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J; Gill, Michael; Korszun, Ania; Maier, Wolfgang; Mors, Ole; Preisig, Martin; Rice, John P; Rietschel, Marcella; Jones, Lisa; Middleton, Lefkos; Aitchison, Kathy J; Davis, Oliver S P; Breen, Gerome; Lewis, Cathryn; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter
Citation:
Relationship between obesity and the risk of clinically significant depression: Mendelian randomisation study. 2014, 205 (1):24-8 Br J Psychiatry
Publisher:
RCPsych
Journal:
The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science
Issue Date:
Jul-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/582380
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.113.130419
PubMed ID:
24809401
Abstract:
Obesity has been shown to be associated with depression and it has been suggested that higher body mass index (BMI) increases the risk of depression and other common mental disorders. However, the causal relationship remains unclear and Mendelian randomisation, a form of instrumental variable analysis, has recently been employed to attempt to resolve this issue.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
OBESITY; DEPRESSION
MeSH:
Adult; Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; Depressive Disorder; Female; Genotype; Humans; Male; Mendelian Randomization Analysis; Middle Aged; Obesity; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
ISSN:
1472-1465

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHung, Chi-Faen
dc.contributor.authorRivera, Margaritaen
dc.contributor.authorCraddock, Nicken
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Michael Jen
dc.contributor.authorGill, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorKorszun, Aniaen
dc.contributor.authorMaier, Wolfgangen
dc.contributor.authorMors, Oleen
dc.contributor.authorPreisig, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorRice, John Pen
dc.contributor.authorRietschel, Marcellaen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorMiddleton, Lefkosen
dc.contributor.authorAitchison, Kathy Jen
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Oliver S Pen
dc.contributor.authorBreen, Geromeen
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Cathrynen
dc.contributor.authorFarmer, Anneen
dc.contributor.authorMcGuffin, Peteren
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-19T10:01:22Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-19T10:01:22Zen
dc.date.issued2014-07en
dc.identifier.citationRelationship between obesity and the risk of clinically significant depression: Mendelian randomisation study. 2014, 205 (1):24-8 Br J Psychiatryen
dc.identifier.issn1472-1465en
dc.identifier.pmid24809401en
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.bp.113.130419en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/582380en
dc.description.abstractObesity has been shown to be associated with depression and it has been suggested that higher body mass index (BMI) increases the risk of depression and other common mental disorders. However, the causal relationship remains unclear and Mendelian randomisation, a form of instrumental variable analysis, has recently been employed to attempt to resolve this issue.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRCPsychen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental scienceen
dc.subjectOBESITYen
dc.subjectDEPRESSIONen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorderen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMendelian Randomization Analysisen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshObesityen
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Single Nucleotideen
dc.titleRelationship between obesity and the risk of clinically significant depression: Mendelian randomisation study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental scienceen
dc.description.fundingOtheren
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.