Exploring key working: parents' perceptions of key workers in Clare Early Intervention Service (CEIS) / [thesis] by Brigid Mullins for Masters in Health Science (Primary Care)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/58193
Title:
Exploring key working: parents' perceptions of key workers in Clare Early Intervention Service (CEIS) / [thesis] by Brigid Mullins for Masters in Health Science (Primary Care)
Authors:
Mullins, Brigid
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Publisher:
National University of Galway Ireland
Issue Date:
Sep-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/58193
Item Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
Research has shown that parents of disabled children face a constant battle to negotiate access to services across different agencies. In order to overcome their difficulties key workers have provided a single point of contact service in the form of a named person. The key worker helps the family navigate through the maze of agencies from therapy services to counselling, family support to respite services. This study aims to explore parents’ perceptions of key workers in Clare Early Intervention Service (CEIS), in order to inform decisions taken on the development of a key worker service for school age children and young people aged 6 to 18 years. A review of the literature was conducted and issues identified for exploration. A primarily quantitative postal questionnaire was sent to 100 parents of children with a disability on the CEIS data base who were identified as having a key worker. A second shorter version of the questionnaire was sent to 60 other parents of children who were identified as not having a key worker from the data base. A 65% response rate was achieved. The results in general support previous studies. The level of provision of key workers was higher than that of other studies (72%). Levels of satisfaction with the key worker service were high (88.4%) and the role was valued greatly by the parents for whom key working was going well. However, the open ended qualitative questions revealed issues of importance to parents such as isolation, confusion and at times lack of consistency in relation to the role of a key worker. The study concluded that key working is a worthwhile service to provide to parents of children with a disability. However, if key working is to be successful it should be a clearly defined role not just an ‘add on’ role to the other professional job. The key worker role needs to be incorporated into the job description, with time allocated for the role and with agreed protocols/standards. A service manager is required to ensure best practice is achieved and sustained, and to provide training for the role.
Keywords:
KEY WORKERS; DISABILITY CARE; PEOPLE WITH DISABILITY; CHILD HEALTH SERVICE; CHILD CARE; PRIMARY CARE SERVICE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMullins, Brigid-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T09:56:18Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T09:56:18Z-
dc.date.issued2008-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/58193-
dc.descriptionResearch has shown that parents of disabled children face a constant battle to negotiate access to services across different agencies. In order to overcome their difficulties key workers have provided a single point of contact service in the form of a named person. The key worker helps the family navigate through the maze of agencies from therapy services to counselling, family support to respite services. This study aims to explore parents’ perceptions of key workers in Clare Early Intervention Service (CEIS), in order to inform decisions taken on the development of a key worker service for school age children and young people aged 6 to 18 years. A review of the literature was conducted and issues identified for exploration. A primarily quantitative postal questionnaire was sent to 100 parents of children with a disability on the CEIS data base who were identified as having a key worker. A second shorter version of the questionnaire was sent to 60 other parents of children who were identified as not having a key worker from the data base. A 65% response rate was achieved. The results in general support previous studies. The level of provision of key workers was higher than that of other studies (72%). Levels of satisfaction with the key worker service were high (88.4%) and the role was valued greatly by the parents for whom key working was going well. However, the open ended qualitative questions revealed issues of importance to parents such as isolation, confusion and at times lack of consistency in relation to the role of a key worker. The study concluded that key working is a worthwhile service to provide to parents of children with a disability. However, if key working is to be successful it should be a clearly defined role not just an ‘add on’ role to the other professional job. The key worker role needs to be incorporated into the job description, with time allocated for the role and with agreed protocols/standards. A service manager is required to ensure best practice is achieved and sustained, and to provide training for the role.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational University of Galway Irelanden
dc.subjectKEY WORKERSen
dc.subjectDISABILITY CAREen
dc.subjectPEOPLE WITH DISABILITYen
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTH SERVICEen
dc.subjectCHILD CAREen
dc.subjectPRIMARY CARE SERVICEen
dc.titleExploring key working: parents' perceptions of key workers in Clare Early Intervention Service (CEIS) / [thesis] by Brigid Mullins for Masters in Health Science (Primary Care)en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
All Items in Lenus,the Irish health repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.