GPs' perspectives on the management of patients with multimorbidity: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/578776
Title:
GPs' perspectives on the management of patients with multimorbidity: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research.
Authors:
Sinnott, Carol; Mc Hugh, Sheena; Browne, John; Bradley, Colin
Affiliation:
UCC
Citation:
GPs' perspectives on the management of patients with multimorbidity: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research. 2013, 3 (9):e003610 BMJ Open
Journal:
BMJ open
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/578776
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003610
PubMed ID:
24038011
Additional Links:
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/3/9/e003610.full
Abstract:
To synthesise the existing published literature on the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs) or their equivalent on the clinical management of multimorbidity and determine targets for future research that aims to improve clinical care in multimorbidity.; Systematic review and metaethnographic synthesis of primary studies that used qualitative methods to explore GPs' experiences of clinical management of multimorbidity or multiple chronic diseases.; EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycInfo, Academic Search Complete, SocIndex, Social Science Full Text and digital theses/online libraries (database inception to September 2012) to identify literature using qualitative methods (focus groups or interviews).; The 7-step metaethnographic approach described by Noblit and Hare, which involves cross-interpretation between studies while preserving the context of the primary data.; Of 1805 articles identified, 37 were reviewed in detail and 10 were included, using a total of 275 GPs in 7 different countries. Four areas of difficulty specific to the management of multimorbidity emerged from these papers: disorganisation and fragmentation of healthcare; the inadequacy of guidelines and evidence-based medicine; challenges in delivering patient-centred care; and barriers to shared decision-making. A 'line of argument' was drawn which described GPs' sense of isolation in decision-making for multimorbid patients.; This systematic review shows that the problem areas for GPs in the management of multimorbidity may be classified into four domains. There will be no 'one size fits all' intervention for multimorbidity but these domains may be useful targets to guide the development of interventions that will assist and improve the provision of care to multimorbid patients.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Objective: To synthesise the existing published literature on the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs) or their equivalent on the clinical management of multimorbidity and determine targets for future research that aims to improve clinical care in multimorbidity. Design: Systematic review and metaethnographic synthesis of primary studies that used qualitative methods to explore GPs’ experiences of clinical management of multimorbidity or multiple chronic diseases. Data sources: EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycInfo, Academic Search Complete, SocIndex, Social Science Full Text and digital theses/online libraries (database inception to September 2012) to identify literature using qualitative methods (focus groups or interviews). Review methods: The 7-step metaethnographic approach described by Noblit and Hare, which involves cross-interpretation between studies while preserving the context of the primary data. Results: Of 1805 articles identified, 37 were reviewed in detail and 10 were included, using a total of 275 GPs in 7 different countries. Four areas of difficulty specific to the management of multimorbidity emerged from these papers: disorganisation and fragmentation of healthcare; the inadequacy of guidelines and evidence-based medicine; challenges in delivering patient-centred care; and barriers to shared decision-making. A ‘line of argument’ was drawn which described GPs’ sense of isolation in decision-making for multimorbid patients. Conclusions: This systematic review shows that the problem areas for GPs in the management of multimorbidity may be classified into four domains. There will be no ‘one size fits all’ intervention for multimorbidity but these domains may be useful targets to guide the development of interventions that will assist and improve the provision of care to multimorbid patients.
Keywords:
GENERAL PRACTICE; MORBIDITY
ISSN:
2044-6055

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSinnott, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorMc Hugh, Sheenaen
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Colinen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-28T08:54:11Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-28T08:54:11Zen
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationGPs' perspectives on the management of patients with multimorbidity: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research. 2013, 3 (9):e003610 BMJ Openen
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055en
dc.identifier.pmid24038011en
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003610en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/578776en
dc.descriptionObjective: To synthesise the existing published literature on the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs) or their equivalent on the clinical management of multimorbidity and determine targets for future research that aims to improve clinical care in multimorbidity. Design: Systematic review and metaethnographic synthesis of primary studies that used qualitative methods to explore GPs’ experiences of clinical management of multimorbidity or multiple chronic diseases. Data sources: EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycInfo, Academic Search Complete, SocIndex, Social Science Full Text and digital theses/online libraries (database inception to September 2012) to identify literature using qualitative methods (focus groups or interviews). Review methods: The 7-step metaethnographic approach described by Noblit and Hare, which involves cross-interpretation between studies while preserving the context of the primary data. Results: Of 1805 articles identified, 37 were reviewed in detail and 10 were included, using a total of 275 GPs in 7 different countries. Four areas of difficulty specific to the management of multimorbidity emerged from these papers: disorganisation and fragmentation of healthcare; the inadequacy of guidelines and evidence-based medicine; challenges in delivering patient-centred care; and barriers to shared decision-making. A ‘line of argument’ was drawn which described GPs’ sense of isolation in decision-making for multimorbid patients. Conclusions: This systematic review shows that the problem areas for GPs in the management of multimorbidity may be classified into four domains. There will be no ‘one size fits all’ intervention for multimorbidity but these domains may be useful targets to guide the development of interventions that will assist and improve the provision of care to multimorbid patients.en
dc.description.abstractTo synthesise the existing published literature on the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs) or their equivalent on the clinical management of multimorbidity and determine targets for future research that aims to improve clinical care in multimorbidity.en
dc.description.abstractSystematic review and metaethnographic synthesis of primary studies that used qualitative methods to explore GPs' experiences of clinical management of multimorbidity or multiple chronic diseases.en
dc.description.abstractEMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycInfo, Academic Search Complete, SocIndex, Social Science Full Text and digital theses/online libraries (database inception to September 2012) to identify literature using qualitative methods (focus groups or interviews).en
dc.description.abstractThe 7-step metaethnographic approach described by Noblit and Hare, which involves cross-interpretation between studies while preserving the context of the primary data.en
dc.description.abstractOf 1805 articles identified, 37 were reviewed in detail and 10 were included, using a total of 275 GPs in 7 different countries. Four areas of difficulty specific to the management of multimorbidity emerged from these papers: disorganisation and fragmentation of healthcare; the inadequacy of guidelines and evidence-based medicine; challenges in delivering patient-centred care; and barriers to shared decision-making. A 'line of argument' was drawn which described GPs' sense of isolation in decision-making for multimorbid patients.en
dc.description.abstractThis systematic review shows that the problem areas for GPs in the management of multimorbidity may be classified into four domains. There will be no 'one size fits all' intervention for multimorbidity but these domains may be useful targets to guide the development of interventions that will assist and improve the provision of care to multimorbid patients.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/3/9/e003610.fullen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMJ openen
dc.subjectGENERAL PRACTICEen
dc.subjectMORBIDITYen
dc.titleGPs' perspectives on the management of patients with multimorbidity: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUCCen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ openen

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