National Perinatal Epidemiology Centre: severe maternal morbidity report 2011.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/577439
Title:
National Perinatal Epidemiology Centre: severe maternal morbidity report 2011.
Authors:
National Perinatal Epidemiology Centre
Affiliation:
UCC
Issue Date:
Mar-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/577439
Additional Links:
https://www.ucc.ie/en/media/research/nationalperinatalepidemiologycentre/SMMReportforweb.pdf
Abstract:
This is the first national audit of severe maternal morbidity in Ireland. Between 1st January 2011 and the 31st December 2011, anonymised data on severe maternal morbidity were collected from 19 of the 20 maternity units in Ireland (this includes one private and 18 public maternity units). In total, 67,806 maternities were reported from the 19 participating maternity units, representing 93% of maternities in Ireland for the calendar year 2011. Severe maternal morbidity was classified as the presence of one or more of 15 categories of maternal morbidity including: major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH), eclampsia, renal/liver dysfunction, cardiac arrest, pulmonary oedema, acute respiratory dysfunction, coma, cerebrovascular accident, status epilepticus, septicaemic shock, anaesthetic complications, pulmonary embolism, peripartum hysterectomy, admission to intensive care and interventional radiology. Major obstetric haemorrhage was defined as an estimated blood loss of ≥ 2,500ml, and or a transfusion of ≥ 5 units of blood and or documented treatment for coagulopathy. The methodology for case ascertainment and morbidity inclusion criteria, adapted by the National Perinatal epidemiology Centre (NPEC), was based on the Scottish Confidential Audit of Severe Maternal Morbidity (SCASMM) and are described in Appendix B. As such, use of this validated data collection tool with the kind permission of the Reproductive Health Programme of the National Health Service (NHS) Quality Improvement Scotland, facilitated international comparison with a relatively similar health care provision service and pregnant population. Although severe maternal morbidity may reflect the complexity of the pregnant population, evaluation of such cases has been acknowledged as a surrogate measure of quality care in the maternity services.
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Keywords:
PREGNANCY; CHILDBIRTH; MORBIDITY; STATISTICAL DATA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNational Perinatal Epidemiology Centreen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-17T15:22:44Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-17T15:22:44Zen
dc.date.issued2013-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/577439en
dc.description.abstractThis is the first national audit of severe maternal morbidity in Ireland. Between 1st January 2011 and the 31st December 2011, anonymised data on severe maternal morbidity were collected from 19 of the 20 maternity units in Ireland (this includes one private and 18 public maternity units). In total, 67,806 maternities were reported from the 19 participating maternity units, representing 93% of maternities in Ireland for the calendar year 2011. Severe maternal morbidity was classified as the presence of one or more of 15 categories of maternal morbidity including: major obstetric haemorrhage (MOH), eclampsia, renal/liver dysfunction, cardiac arrest, pulmonary oedema, acute respiratory dysfunction, coma, cerebrovascular accident, status epilepticus, septicaemic shock, anaesthetic complications, pulmonary embolism, peripartum hysterectomy, admission to intensive care and interventional radiology. Major obstetric haemorrhage was defined as an estimated blood loss of ≥ 2,500ml, and or a transfusion of ≥ 5 units of blood and or documented treatment for coagulopathy. The methodology for case ascertainment and morbidity inclusion criteria, adapted by the National Perinatal epidemiology Centre (NPEC), was based on the Scottish Confidential Audit of Severe Maternal Morbidity (SCASMM) and are described in Appendix B. As such, use of this validated data collection tool with the kind permission of the Reproductive Health Programme of the National Health Service (NHS) Quality Improvement Scotland, facilitated international comparison with a relatively similar health care provision service and pregnant population. Although severe maternal morbidity may reflect the complexity of the pregnant population, evaluation of such cases has been acknowledged as a surrogate measure of quality care in the maternity services.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.ucc.ie/en/media/research/nationalperinatalepidemiologycentre/SMMReportforweb.pdfen
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen
dc.subjectCHILDBIRTHen
dc.subjectMORBIDITYen
dc.subjectSTATISTICAL DATAen
dc.titleNational Perinatal Epidemiology Centre: severe maternal morbidity report 2011.en
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentUCCen
dc.description.fundingOtheren
dc.description.provinceMunsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewotheren
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