Caring for patients with suicidal behaviour: an exploratory study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/577371
Title:
Caring for patients with suicidal behaviour: an exploratory study.
Authors:
Doyle, Louise; Keogh, Brian; Morrissey, Jean
Affiliation:
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Doyle, L ., Keogh, B. & Morrissey, J., Caring for patients with Suicidal Behaviour: an Exploratory Study, British Journal of Nursing, 16, (19), 2007, p1218 - 1222
Publisher:
Mark Allen Publishing
Journal:
British journal of nursing
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/577371
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Presentation to the Emergency Department (ED) of patients with suicidal behaviours is relatively common. While many of these patients may be referred on to specialist mental health services, many are either discharged with no psychiatric follow-up or leave before being seen. There is therefore an increasing onus on the staff of Emergency Departments to become involved in the assessment and initial management of this patient group. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences and challenges that nurses encounter when caring for patients who present to the ED with suicidal behaviour. Forty-two ED nurses completed a 15-item semi-structured questionnaire. Participants in this study identified risk assessment as part of their role but did not focus on psychosocial assessment or psychological management of this patient group. Feelings of sympathy and compassion were reported towards these patients; however, there was often a prior judgement of the perceived ‘genuineness’ of the presentation. Finally, challenges experienced included a lack of appropriate communication skills and insufficient resources within the ED department to adequately care for this vulnerable patient group.
Keywords:
SUICIDE; NURSE; ACUTE CARE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Louiseen
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, Brianen
dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, Jeanen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-16T09:43:58Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-16T09:43:58Zen
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.citationDoyle, L ., Keogh, B. & Morrissey, J., Caring for patients with Suicidal Behaviour: an Exploratory Study, British Journal of Nursing, 16, (19), 2007, p1218 - 1222en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/577371en
dc.descriptionPresentation to the Emergency Department (ED) of patients with suicidal behaviours is relatively common. While many of these patients may be referred on to specialist mental health services, many are either discharged with no psychiatric follow-up or leave before being seen. There is therefore an increasing onus on the staff of Emergency Departments to become involved in the assessment and initial management of this patient group. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences and challenges that nurses encounter when caring for patients who present to the ED with suicidal behaviour. Forty-two ED nurses completed a 15-item semi-structured questionnaire. Participants in this study identified risk assessment as part of their role but did not focus on psychosocial assessment or psychological management of this patient group. Feelings of sympathy and compassion were reported towards these patients; however, there was often a prior judgement of the perceived ‘genuineness’ of the presentation. Finally, challenges experienced included a lack of appropriate communication skills and insufficient resources within the ED department to adequately care for this vulnerable patient group.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMark Allen Publishingen
dc.subjectSUICIDEen
dc.subjectNURSEen
dc.subjectACUTE CAREen
dc.titleCaring for patients with suicidal behaviour: an exploratory study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish journal of nursingen
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