Self-harm in young people: Prevalence, associated factors and help-seeking in school-going adolescents

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/577263
Title:
Self-harm in young people: Prevalence, associated factors and help-seeking in school-going adolescents
Authors:
Doyle, L; Treacy, M P; Sheridan, A
Affiliation:
1 School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland 2 School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Citation:
Doyle, L., Treacy, M. P. and Sheridan, A. (2015), Self-harm in young people: Prevalence, associated factors, and help-seeking in school-going adolescents. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. doi: 10.1111/inm.12144
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
International Journal of Mental Health Nursing.
Issue Date:
28-Jul-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/577263
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Adolescent self-harm is recognised as a serious public health problem however there is little reliable comparative data on its prevalence or characteristics or on the extent of help-seeking for self-harm. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and associated factors of adolescent self-harm in an urban region in Ireland and to investigate help-seeking behaviours for self-harm. This was a cross-sectional study of 856 school-going adolescents employing an anonymous self-report questionnaire. A lifetime history of self-harm was reported by 12.1% of adolescents. Factors independently associated with self-harm included exposure to self-harm of a friend/family member. Professional help-seeking was uncommon prior to (9%) and after (12%) self-harm. Furthermore, only 6.9% of adolescents presented to hospital as a result of their last self-harm act. These findings indicate that self-harm is common in adolescents however seeking professional help is not a common phenomenon and those who present to hospital represent the ‘tip of the iceberg’ of adolescent self-harm. Identifying the prevalence of self-harm and associated factors in addition to help-seeking behaviours in young people is important to determine the preventative programmes to target ‘at-risk’ groups. Mental health nurses have an important and increasing role to play in such school-based initiatives.
Keywords:
ADOLESCENCE; MENTAL HEALTH; SELF HARM

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Len
dc.contributor.authorTreacy, M Pen
dc.contributor.authorSheridan, Aen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-14T11:01:48Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-14T11:01:48Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07-28en
dc.identifier.citationDoyle, L., Treacy, M. P. and Sheridan, A. (2015), Self-harm in young people: Prevalence, associated factors, and help-seeking in school-going adolescents. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. doi: 10.1111/inm.12144en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/577263en
dc.descriptionAdolescent self-harm is recognised as a serious public health problem however there is little reliable comparative data on its prevalence or characteristics or on the extent of help-seeking for self-harm. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and associated factors of adolescent self-harm in an urban region in Ireland and to investigate help-seeking behaviours for self-harm. This was a cross-sectional study of 856 school-going adolescents employing an anonymous self-report questionnaire. A lifetime history of self-harm was reported by 12.1% of adolescents. Factors independently associated with self-harm included exposure to self-harm of a friend/family member. Professional help-seeking was uncommon prior to (9%) and after (12%) self-harm. Furthermore, only 6.9% of adolescents presented to hospital as a result of their last self-harm act. These findings indicate that self-harm is common in adolescents however seeking professional help is not a common phenomenon and those who present to hospital represent the ‘tip of the iceberg’ of adolescent self-harm. Identifying the prevalence of self-harm and associated factors in addition to help-seeking behaviours in young people is important to determine the preventative programmes to target ‘at-risk’ groups. Mental health nurses have an important and increasing role to play in such school-based initiatives.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.subjectADOLESCENCEen
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTHen
dc.subjectSELF HARMen
dc.titleSelf-harm in young people: Prevalence, associated factors and help-seeking in school-going adolescentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1 School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland 2 School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems, University College Dublin, Dublin, Irelanden
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Mental Health Nursing.en
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.