Fundamentals of occlusion and restorative dentistry. Part I: basic principles

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575952
Title:
Fundamentals of occlusion and restorative dentistry. Part I: basic principles
Authors:
Warreth, Abdulhadi
Publisher:
Irish Dental Association (IDA)
Journal:
Irish Dental Association (IDA)
Issue Date:
Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575952
Abstract:
One of the goals of restorative treatment is maintenance and/or reestablishment of a good dental occlusion when the treatment is completed.1,2 Therefore, restorative treatment should be aimed at the achievement of smooth unhindered mandibular movements during function. The outcome should not result in an occlusal interference, nor should it lead to generation of excessive force on the teeth, the periodontal apparatus or the temporomandibular joints (TMJs).3,4 All members of the masticatory system should work in harmony and accommodate the changes in occlusal morphology of the finished restoration well.4 Therefore, dentists must have a sound knowledge of dental occlusion and masticatory systems. This article provides clarification of the basic principles of dental occlusion, as well as an overview of this subject area, which is vital for every dental student and dentist. To avoid confusion, the terms and definitions of the Glossary of Prosthodontics5 are used.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
DENTAL HEALTH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWarreth, Abdulhadien
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-26T10:42:07Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-26T10:42:07Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/575952en
dc.description.abstractOne of the goals of restorative treatment is maintenance and/or reestablishment of a good dental occlusion when the treatment is completed.1,2 Therefore, restorative treatment should be aimed at the achievement of smooth unhindered mandibular movements during function. The outcome should not result in an occlusal interference, nor should it lead to generation of excessive force on the teeth, the periodontal apparatus or the temporomandibular joints (TMJs).3,4 All members of the masticatory system should work in harmony and accommodate the changes in occlusal morphology of the finished restoration well.4 Therefore, dentists must have a sound knowledge of dental occlusion and masticatory systems. This article provides clarification of the basic principles of dental occlusion, as well as an overview of this subject area, which is vital for every dental student and dentist. To avoid confusion, the terms and definitions of the Glossary of Prosthodontics5 are used.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Dental Association (IDA)en
dc.subjectDENTAL HEALTHen
dc.titleFundamentals of occlusion and restorative dentistry. Part I: basic principlesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Dental Association (IDA)en
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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