Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575445
Title:
Rare Bleeding Disorders
Authors:
Irish Haemophilia Society (IHS)
Publisher:
Irish Haemophilia Society (IHS)
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575445
Item Type:
Other
Language:
en
Description:
The best known and most common bleeding disorders are Haemophilia A (Factor VIII deficiency), Haemophilia B (Factor IX deficiency) and von Willebrand Disease. However, these do not represent all bleeding disorders. There are a large number of rarer bleeding disorders both of coagulation factors and of platelets. This publication deals with nine disorders affecting coagulation factors I, II, V, VII, X, XI and XIII, in addition to two disorders affecting platelets. Generally the prevalence of these rarer bleedings disorders varies from 1: 100,000 (Factor XI deficiency) to 1: 3 million (Factor XIII deficiency). The prevelance of many of these rare bleeding disorders is higher in Ireland. The reasons for this are not clear, but a small gene pool of large family sizes in the past may be contributory factors. At the time of production of this booklet, there are 443 people with rare bleeding disorders registered with the National Centre for Hereditary Coagulation Disorders in Ireland

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIrish Haemophilia Society (IHS)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T11:38:57Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-21T11:38:57Zen
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/575445en
dc.descriptionThe best known and most common bleeding disorders are Haemophilia A (Factor VIII deficiency), Haemophilia B (Factor IX deficiency) and von Willebrand Disease. However, these do not represent all bleeding disorders. There are a large number of rarer bleeding disorders both of coagulation factors and of platelets. This publication deals with nine disorders affecting coagulation factors I, II, V, VII, X, XI and XIII, in addition to two disorders affecting platelets. Generally the prevalence of these rarer bleedings disorders varies from 1: 100,000 (Factor XI deficiency) to 1: 3 million (Factor XIII deficiency). The prevelance of many of these rare bleeding disorders is higher in Ireland. The reasons for this are not clear, but a small gene pool of large family sizes in the past may be contributory factors. At the time of production of this booklet, there are 443 people with rare bleeding disorders registered with the National Centre for Hereditary Coagulation Disorders in Irelanden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Haemophilia Society (IHS)en
dc.titleRare Bleeding Disordersen
dc.typeOtheren
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