National Hepatitis C Database for infection acquired through blood and blood products

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575421
Title:
National Hepatitis C Database for infection acquired through blood and blood products
Authors:
Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575421
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Hepatitis C infection is a major cause of liver disease and it is estimated that up to 20% of people with chronic infection will develop cirrhosis over a 20 to 25 year period. Very effective treatment is now available, which eradicates the virus in over 50% of cases. Approximately 1,700 people in Ireland became infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) through contaminated blood and blood products. The National Hepatitis C Database was established to gather information on people infected in this way. This report describes the results of the third round of data collection. Main findings Profile of participants • Twenty eight people have been added to the database since the last round of data collection. The total number of participants is 1,303 (76% of those eligible). • Older people were more likely to participate in the database. • The majority of database participants were infected through contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin (62%), with 26% infected through receipt of blood transfusions or treatment for renal disease, and 12% through blood clotting factors. • 73% of the database population are females, reflecting the large anti-D cohort. • The average age of the database population is now 57 years and the average duration of infection is 30 years. These figures vary by source of infection: o The larger anti-D cohort (1977-79 outbreak) have an average age of 58 years and duration of infection of 31 years. o The smaller anti-D cohort (1991-94 outbreak) have an average age of 45 years and duration of infection of 15 years. o The blood transfusion/renal group have an average age of 60 years and duration of infection of 23 years. o The blood clotting factor group have an average age of 44.5 years and duration of infection of 31 years. Hepatitis C status • Overall, 62% of participants had tested HCV RNA positive (indicating active infection) at least once, and a further 15% had positive HCV confirmatory antibody tests but no positive RNA results. The remaining 23% tested either ELISA/EIA (screening test) positive/weak positive or had an indeterminate result on confirmatory testing. • The true viral clearance rate for participants is likely to be between 19% and 36% (having taken account of those who died before RNA testing, and allowing for the possibility that some participants may have had false positive screening test results). • Females were significantly more likely to have cleared the virus at the time of diagnosis. • 76% were HCV genotype 1 and 19% genotype 3.
Keywords:
HEPATITIS C; BLOOD TRANSFUSION; BLOODBORNE TRANSMISSION; INFECTION CONTROL
ISSN:
978-0-9551236-2-7

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T10:53:55Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-21T10:53:55Zen
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.issn978-0-9551236-2-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/575421en
dc.descriptionHepatitis C infection is a major cause of liver disease and it is estimated that up to 20% of people with chronic infection will develop cirrhosis over a 20 to 25 year period. Very effective treatment is now available, which eradicates the virus in over 50% of cases. Approximately 1,700 people in Ireland became infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) through contaminated blood and blood products. The National Hepatitis C Database was established to gather information on people infected in this way. This report describes the results of the third round of data collection. Main findings Profile of participants • Twenty eight people have been added to the database since the last round of data collection. The total number of participants is 1,303 (76% of those eligible). • Older people were more likely to participate in the database. • The majority of database participants were infected through contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin (62%), with 26% infected through receipt of blood transfusions or treatment for renal disease, and 12% through blood clotting factors. • 73% of the database population are females, reflecting the large anti-D cohort. • The average age of the database population is now 57 years and the average duration of infection is 30 years. These figures vary by source of infection: o The larger anti-D cohort (1977-79 outbreak) have an average age of 58 years and duration of infection of 31 years. o The smaller anti-D cohort (1991-94 outbreak) have an average age of 45 years and duration of infection of 15 years. o The blood transfusion/renal group have an average age of 60 years and duration of infection of 23 years. o The blood clotting factor group have an average age of 44.5 years and duration of infection of 31 years. Hepatitis C status • Overall, 62% of participants had tested HCV RNA positive (indicating active infection) at least once, and a further 15% had positive HCV confirmatory antibody tests but no positive RNA results. The remaining 23% tested either ELISA/EIA (screening test) positive/weak positive or had an indeterminate result on confirmatory testing. • The true viral clearance rate for participants is likely to be between 19% and 36% (having taken account of those who died before RNA testing, and allowing for the possibility that some participants may have had false positive screening test results). • Females were significantly more likely to have cleared the virus at the time of diagnosis. • 76% were HCV genotype 1 and 19% genotype 3.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHEPATITIS Cen
dc.subjectBLOOD TRANSFUSIONen
dc.subjectBLOODBORNE TRANSMISSIONen
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen
dc.titleNational Hepatitis C Database for infection acquired through blood and blood productsen
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executive (HSE)en
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