Young people and their food choices: a report prepared for CBF The Irish Meat Board.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575278
Title:
Young people and their food choices: a report prepared for CBF The Irish Meat Board.
Authors:
Cunningham, Kay
Affiliation:
Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute.
Citation:
Cunningham, Kay, 1990. Young people and their food choices: a report prepared for CBF The Irish Meat Board. Dublin: Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute.
Publisher:
Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute
Issue Date:
1990
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575278
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The National Nutrition Survey (1) showed that while on the whole Irish teenagers were well nourished, trends emerging showed that bad eating habits can be detected in the teen years. The present study shows thar young people are leading very 'rushed' lives - rising early, some travelling long distances to school. The majority (78%) have a cereal and or bread - type breakfast, 11 % have eggs, cooked breakfast and 11 % no breakfast. Snacks such as crisps, coke and chocolates were consumed on the way to school, often instead of breakfast. These foods also formed an important part of the mid-morning break, either brought from home or purchased in the school tuck-shop. Mosr pupils favoured sandwiches or fiIIed rolls for lunch with ham, cheese and tuna the most popular fillings. A worrying trend emerging was the number of pupils, mainly rural and mainly boys. who were selecting high-fat meals eg chips, chips and burgers and chips every day at lunch time. 4.4% of pupils had nothing for lunch on the day of the study. Sweets, chocolates, crisps. fruit and cereal are rhe most popular treats
Keywords:
NUTRITION; YOUNG PEOPLE; SCHOOL; FAST FOOD
Sponsors:
CBF. The Irish Meat Board

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Kayen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T15:42:21Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-19T15:42:21Zen
dc.date.issued1990en
dc.identifier.citationCunningham, Kay, 1990. Young people and their food choices: a report prepared for CBF The Irish Meat Board. Dublin: Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/575278en
dc.descriptionThe National Nutrition Survey (1) showed that while on the whole Irish teenagers were well nourished, trends emerging showed that bad eating habits can be detected in the teen years. The present study shows thar young people are leading very 'rushed' lives - rising early, some travelling long distances to school. The majority (78%) have a cereal and or bread - type breakfast, 11 % have eggs, cooked breakfast and 11 % no breakfast. Snacks such as crisps, coke and chocolates were consumed on the way to school, often instead of breakfast. These foods also formed an important part of the mid-morning break, either brought from home or purchased in the school tuck-shop. Mosr pupils favoured sandwiches or fiIIed rolls for lunch with ham, cheese and tuna the most popular fillings. A worrying trend emerging was the number of pupils, mainly rural and mainly boys. who were selecting high-fat meals eg chips, chips and burgers and chips every day at lunch time. 4.4% of pupils had nothing for lunch on the day of the study. Sweets, chocolates, crisps. fruit and cereal are rhe most popular treatsen
dc.description.sponsorshipCBF. The Irish Meat Boarden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Nutrition and Dietetic Instituteen
dc.subjectNUTRITIONen
dc.subjectYOUNG PEOPLEen
dc.subjectSCHOOLen
dc.subjectFAST FOODen
dc.titleYoung people and their food choices: a report prepared for CBF The Irish Meat Board.en
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentIrish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute.en
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