Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575277
Title:
Irish Nurses Organisation annual report 1999.
Authors:
Irish Nurses Organisation (INO)
Citation:
Irish Nurses Organisation (INO). 2000. Irish Nurses Organisation annual report 1999. Dublin: Irish Nurses Organisation (INO)
Publisher:
Irish Nurses Organisation (INO)
Issue Date:
2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575277
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
It is my great pleasure, as President of the Irish Nurses Organisation, to present this Annual Report for the year 1999. It is a report which records a substantial amount of work on behalf of nurses, midwives and their professions. The shadow of a national strike hung over the Organisation throughout the year and history will record that 1999 was a turning point for nurses and the nursing profession in Ireland. Tuesday, 19 October 1999, will go down in the annals as the day Irish nurses stood up and were counted. It was a day Irish nurses thought they would never see the day that they had to resort to a nationwide strike to demonstrate how undervalued and frustrated they felt at not being given a fair deal for better pay and conditions. At 8.00am on 19 October 1999, nurses turned up for picket duty and to provide emergency care at over 1,000 locations throughout the country. All members were working free of charge due to the fact that the strike fund, which while it might be ample for prolonged local disputes, could never sustain a strike of this magnitude, the largest strike in the history of the state. On the third day of the strike, over 10,000 nurses marched through the streets of Dublin and rallied outside the GPO, demonstrating the strength of their conviction in their fight for fair pay and conditions. Throughout the strike nurses proved their willingness to ensure that no patient, in need of emergency care, went without a nurse. Strike committees took responsibility for determining emergency cover and picket rosters for the duration of the strike which lasted nine days. A full report of the pay campaign and national strike can be found on pages 15-27. On behalf of the Executive Council I would like to express a special word of thanks to the members of the strike committees who performed their difficult tasks with dedication and professionalism. I would also like to thank our thousands of members who participated in the rally to the GPO and, last, but by no means least, I would like to pay tribute to all our members, at all levels, in all disciplines and in all services, for their commitment and involvement during the strike. Successful delivery would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of all involved.
Keywords:
NURSES; MIDWIFE; SALARY; ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIrish Nurses Organisation (INO)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T15:28:38Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-19T15:28:38Zen
dc.date.issued2000en
dc.identifier.citationIrish Nurses Organisation (INO). 2000. Irish Nurses Organisation annual report 1999. Dublin: Irish Nurses Organisation (INO)en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/575277en
dc.descriptionIt is my great pleasure, as President of the Irish Nurses Organisation, to present this Annual Report for the year 1999. It is a report which records a substantial amount of work on behalf of nurses, midwives and their professions. The shadow of a national strike hung over the Organisation throughout the year and history will record that 1999 was a turning point for nurses and the nursing profession in Ireland. Tuesday, 19 October 1999, will go down in the annals as the day Irish nurses stood up and were counted. It was a day Irish nurses thought they would never see the day that they had to resort to a nationwide strike to demonstrate how undervalued and frustrated they felt at not being given a fair deal for better pay and conditions. At 8.00am on 19 October 1999, nurses turned up for picket duty and to provide emergency care at over 1,000 locations throughout the country. All members were working free of charge due to the fact that the strike fund, which while it might be ample for prolonged local disputes, could never sustain a strike of this magnitude, the largest strike in the history of the state. On the third day of the strike, over 10,000 nurses marched through the streets of Dublin and rallied outside the GPO, demonstrating the strength of their conviction in their fight for fair pay and conditions. Throughout the strike nurses proved their willingness to ensure that no patient, in need of emergency care, went without a nurse. Strike committees took responsibility for determining emergency cover and picket rosters for the duration of the strike which lasted nine days. A full report of the pay campaign and national strike can be found on pages 15-27. On behalf of the Executive Council I would like to express a special word of thanks to the members of the strike committees who performed their difficult tasks with dedication and professionalism. I would also like to thank our thousands of members who participated in the rally to the GPO and, last, but by no means least, I would like to pay tribute to all our members, at all levels, in all disciplines and in all services, for their commitment and involvement during the strike. Successful delivery would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of all involved.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Nurses Organisation (INO)en
dc.subjectNURSESen
dc.subjectMIDWIFEen
dc.subjectSALARYen
dc.subjectORGANISATIONAL CHANGEen
dc.titleIrish Nurses Organisation annual report 1999.en
dc.typeReporten
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