The population structure and living circumstances of Irish travellers: results from the 1981 Census of travelling families.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575268
Title:
The population structure and living circumstances of Irish travellers: results from the 1981 Census of travelling families.
Authors:
Rottman, David B.; Tussing, A. Dale; Wiley, Miriam M.
Affiliation:
Economic and Social Research Institute
Citation:
Rottman, David B., Tussing, A. Dale, Wiley, Miriam M. 1986. The population structure and living circumstances of Irish travellers: results from the 1981 Census of travelling families. Dublin: Economic and Social Research Institute.
Publisher:
Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)
Issue Date:
Jul-1986
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575268
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The 1981 Census of Travelling People was carried out under the direction of the authors in response to a request from the Travelling People Review Body. The Review Body was created in 1981 by the Minister for Health and the Minister for the Environment. Its report was published in 1983. This paper reports on that Census. Chapter 1 serves as a general introduction, discusses the origins of the Travellers, and reviews previous Censuses. Chapter 2 turns to presentation of the main Census findings, which describe the size and composition of the population of the Travellers, and household structure. Tentative conclusions are drawn about age at marriage, fertility and mortality. Chapter 3 examines the geographic distribution of Travellers by places of current and past residence, duration of residence, and patterns of migration. Chapter 4 discusses the living conditions experienced by Travellers, including type of housing and access to water, sanitary facilities, and electricity. Chapter 5 sets out the authors' conclusions and policy recommendations. The Irish Travellers are almost certainly indigenous. They are a small, uniquely disadvantaged, minority itinerant subgroup, living on the periphery of Irish society. Recent economic and social change has tended to reduce the opportunity for Travellers to fill a valued role in Irish society; it has also tended to make urban rather than rural areas the locus of Traveller life. Individual Traveller families may, or may not, currently live an itinerant existence. The 1981 Census records a total population of 14,131 persons, of whom 5,946 were living along the roadside, in caravans, wagons, huts or tents. Most of the remainder-lived in "standard housing", mainly local authority. Of the roadside Travellers, approximately one-fifth had lived on their present sites, and twothirds in their present counties, for more than a year. While all Travellers have been on the road or descend from those who have, and thus share that tradition, it is not itinerancy per se that unifies them. Instead, they are a distinct subgroup who tend to marry and make strong friendships only amongst themselves. However, it is clear that the Traveller identity today embraces several· lifestyles, a combination of choice and force of circumstances. Most data are reported
Keywords:
GYPSIES AND TRAVELLERS; HOUSING; MARRIAGE; MORTALITY
Series/Report no.:
Paper; 131
ISBN:
070700084

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRottman, David B.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorTussing, A. Daleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWiley, Miriam M.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T13:59:17Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-19T13:59:17Zen
dc.date.issued1986-07-
dc.identifier.citationRottman, David B., Tussing, A. Dale, Wiley, Miriam M. 1986. The population structure and living circumstances of Irish travellers: results from the 1981 Census of travelling families. Dublin: Economic and Social Research Institute.en_GB
dc.identifier.isbn070700084-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/575268en
dc.descriptionThe 1981 Census of Travelling People was carried out under the direction of the authors in response to a request from the Travelling People Review Body. The Review Body was created in 1981 by the Minister for Health and the Minister for the Environment. Its report was published in 1983. This paper reports on that Census. Chapter 1 serves as a general introduction, discusses the origins of the Travellers, and reviews previous Censuses. Chapter 2 turns to presentation of the main Census findings, which describe the size and composition of the population of the Travellers, and household structure. Tentative conclusions are drawn about age at marriage, fertility and mortality. Chapter 3 examines the geographic distribution of Travellers by places of current and past residence, duration of residence, and patterns of migration. Chapter 4 discusses the living conditions experienced by Travellers, including type of housing and access to water, sanitary facilities, and electricity. Chapter 5 sets out the authors' conclusions and policy recommendations. The Irish Travellers are almost certainly indigenous. They are a small, uniquely disadvantaged, minority itinerant subgroup, living on the periphery of Irish society. Recent economic and social change has tended to reduce the opportunity for Travellers to fill a valued role in Irish society; it has also tended to make urban rather than rural areas the locus of Traveller life. Individual Traveller families may, or may not, currently live an itinerant existence. The 1981 Census records a total population of 14,131 persons, of whom 5,946 were living along the roadside, in caravans, wagons, huts or tents. Most of the remainder-lived in "standard housing", mainly local authority. Of the roadside Travellers, approximately one-fifth had lived on their present sites, and twothirds in their present counties, for more than a year. While all Travellers have been on the road or descend from those who have, and thus share that tradition, it is not itinerancy per se that unifies them. Instead, they are a distinct subgroup who tend to marry and make strong friendships only amongst themselves. However, it is clear that the Traveller identity today embraces several· lifestyles, a combination of choice and force of circumstances. Most data are reporteden_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEconomic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)en_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPaperen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseries131en_GB
dc.subjectGYPSIES AND TRAVELLERSen_GB
dc.subjectHOUSINGen_GB
dc.subjectMARRIAGEen_GB
dc.subjectMORTALITYen_GB
dc.titleThe population structure and living circumstances of Irish travellers: results from the 1981 Census of travelling families.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentEconomic and Social Research Instituteen_GB
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