Pathways to the future: a seminar focusing on disadvantaged youth and vocational training,13-14 November, 1996.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575265
Title:
Pathways to the future: a seminar focusing on disadvantaged youth and vocational training,13-14 November, 1996.
Authors:
St Vincent's Trust; Sign Project
Citation:
St Vincent's Trust. 1996. Pathways to the future: a seminar focusing on disadvantaged youth and vocational training 13-14 November, 1996. Dublin: St Vincent's Trust.
Publisher:
St Vincent's Trust.
Issue Date:
14-Nov-1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575265
Item Type:
Conference Presentation
Language:
en
Description:
This is a very important and timely report of an international seminar on early school leaving. The SIGN seminar, which took place in November 1997 created a lively and stimulating forum of discussion and debate for organisations working in the field of vocational training with disadvantaged youth. The seminar provided a valuable opportunity to examine the insights and models of good practice from some of the most committed and effective agents working in this area in Ireland. The report's major strength is clear in its exploration of how vocational training organisations can network with each other and share information on effective models of working with young people who leave school early. The benefits of networking and joint action by such intervention agents are obvious in the quality of the report presented here. The institutional weaknesses of Community Training Workshop Youthreach provision as compared to the formal educational training system, creates serious problems for continuing effective interventions. In this context it is very important to support the networking and policy development seminars such as this. Educational under-achievement is the most predictive factor of persistent youth unemployment and associated social exclusion amongst young people entering the labour market for the first time. This is particularly the case with young people who leave school before doing the Junior Certificate examination or young people who effectively fail or attain poor grades in that examination. In Ireland about 8% of the school leaving cohort (around 6,000) leave school each year with poor or no educational qualifications. This is alarming in the context of a rapidly changing economy where those without qualifications show disproportionately high unemployment rates.
Keywords:
EDUCATION; EDUCATIONAL STANDARD; UNEMPLOYENT; SOCIAL EXCLUSION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSt Vincent's Trusten_GB
dc.contributor.authorSign Projecten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T13:48:50Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-19T13:48:50Zen
dc.date.issued1996-11-14-
dc.identifier.citationSt Vincent's Trust. 1996. Pathways to the future: a seminar focusing on disadvantaged youth and vocational training 13-14 November, 1996. Dublin: St Vincent's Trust.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/575265en
dc.descriptionThis is a very important and timely report of an international seminar on early school leaving. The SIGN seminar, which took place in November 1997 created a lively and stimulating forum of discussion and debate for organisations working in the field of vocational training with disadvantaged youth. The seminar provided a valuable opportunity to examine the insights and models of good practice from some of the most committed and effective agents working in this area in Ireland. The report's major strength is clear in its exploration of how vocational training organisations can network with each other and share information on effective models of working with young people who leave school early. The benefits of networking and joint action by such intervention agents are obvious in the quality of the report presented here. The institutional weaknesses of Community Training Workshop Youthreach provision as compared to the formal educational training system, creates serious problems for continuing effective interventions. In this context it is very important to support the networking and policy development seminars such as this. Educational under-achievement is the most predictive factor of persistent youth unemployment and associated social exclusion amongst young people entering the labour market for the first time. This is particularly the case with young people who leave school before doing the Junior Certificate examination or young people who effectively fail or attain poor grades in that examination. In Ireland about 8% of the school leaving cohort (around 6,000) leave school each year with poor or no educational qualifications. This is alarming in the context of a rapidly changing economy where those without qualifications show disproportionately high unemployment rates.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSt Vincent's Trust.en_GB
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen_GB
dc.subjectEDUCATIONAL STANDARDen_GB
dc.subjectUNEMPLOYENTen_GB
dc.subjectSOCIAL EXCLUSIONen_GB
dc.titlePathways to the future: a seminar focusing on disadvantaged youth and vocational training,13-14 November, 1996.en_GB
dc.typeConference Presentationen
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