Assisted human reproduction: social, ethical and legal factors: a one day private conference organised by the Commission on Human Reproduction.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575227
Title:
Assisted human reproduction: social, ethical and legal factors: a one day private conference organised by the Commission on Human Reproduction.
Authors:
Commission on Assisten Human Reproduction.
Citation:
Commission on Assisted Human Reproduction. 2001. Commission on Human Assisted Human Reproduction: social, ethical and legal factors: a one day private conference organised by the Commission on Human Reproduction. 2001. Dublin: Commission of Human Reproduction.
Publisher:
Commission on Assisted Human Reproduction
Issue Date:
Sep-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575227
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
One might say the object of regulation is to set and maintain the acceptable limits of what is being regulated. To set the minimum standard that is compatible with the social and ethical. norms, as interpreted by the competent authority which could be at local, national or international level, depending on the source of its legitimacy. This process is a constantly evolving one, involving the identification of minimum standards and optimum practices. A second objective of regulation is surely to provide public reassurance, which means that society must be able to observe the process of regulation and be persuaded that that it is subject to ongoing surveillance. This must involve the monitoring, recording and reviewing of optimum practices to feed back into the-regulatory scheme. Regulation seeks to achieve these objectives by using a structured approach, identifying key principles and practices - building pillars of regulation. Essentially there are two stages: (i) establishing principles, and in establishing the Structures and mechanisms appropriate to these principles.
Keywords:
REGULATION; ETHICS; MONITORING

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCommission on Assisten Human Reproduction.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-19T11:00:07Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-19T11:00:07Zen
dc.date.issued2001-09-
dc.identifier.citationCommission on Assisted Human Reproduction. 2001. Commission on Human Assisted Human Reproduction: social, ethical and legal factors: a one day private conference organised by the Commission on Human Reproduction. 2001. Dublin: Commission of Human Reproduction.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/575227en
dc.descriptionOne might say the object of regulation is to set and maintain the acceptable limits of what is being regulated. To set the minimum standard that is compatible with the social and ethical. norms, as interpreted by the competent authority which could be at local, national or international level, depending on the source of its legitimacy. This process is a constantly evolving one, involving the identification of minimum standards and optimum practices. A second objective of regulation is surely to provide public reassurance, which means that society must be able to observe the process of regulation and be persuaded that that it is subject to ongoing surveillance. This must involve the monitoring, recording and reviewing of optimum practices to feed back into the-regulatory scheme. Regulation seeks to achieve these objectives by using a structured approach, identifying key principles and practices - building pillars of regulation. Essentially there are two stages: (i) establishing principles, and in establishing the Structures and mechanisms appropriate to these principles.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCommission on Assisted Human Reproductionen_GB
dc.subjectREGULATIONen_GB
dc.subjectETHICSen_GB
dc.subjectMONITORINGen_GB
dc.titleAssisted human reproduction: social, ethical and legal factors: a one day private conference organised by the Commission on Human Reproduction.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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