Meningococcal C vaccine: Meninigitis C: facts for the healthcare professions.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575174
Title:
Meningococcal C vaccine: Meninigitis C: facts for the healthcare professions.
Authors:
Department of Health and Children. Office for Health Gain.; Irish College of General Pratitioners; NDSC
Citation:
Department of Health and Children, Office for Health Gain, ICGP, NDSC. 2000. Meningococcal C vaccine: Meninigitis C: facts for the healthcare professions. Dublin: Department of Health and Children. Office for Health Gain.
Publisher:
Department of Health and Children. Office for Health Gain.
Issue Date:
Sep-2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575174
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Meningococcal disease results from a bacterial infection caused by the organism Neisseria meningitidis. This bacterium may cause both endemic and epidemic disease. The route of transmission is through droplets or respiratory secretions (e.g. coughing and sneezing), or more directly through kissing. Transmission from person to person requires either frequent or close prolonged contact. Nasopharyngeal carriage of meningococci is unusual in infants and young children. However, up to 25% of adolescents and 5 - 11% of adults naturally carry the bacteria without manifesting any signs or symptoms of the disease (known as carriers). What triggers the disease to develop in a susceptible person-is unknown.
Keywords:
HEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT; MENINGITIS; COMMUNICABLE DISEASE; EPIDEMIC

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health and Children. Office for Health Gain.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorIrish College of General Pratitionersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNDSCen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-18T15:31:04Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-18T15:31:04Zen
dc.date.issued2000-09-
dc.identifier.citationDepartment of Health and Children, Office for Health Gain, ICGP, NDSC. 2000. Meningococcal C vaccine: Meninigitis C: facts for the healthcare professions. Dublin: Department of Health and Children. Office for Health Gain.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/575174en
dc.descriptionMeningococcal disease results from a bacterial infection caused by the organism Neisseria meningitidis. This bacterium may cause both endemic and epidemic disease. The route of transmission is through droplets or respiratory secretions (e.g. coughing and sneezing), or more directly through kissing. Transmission from person to person requires either frequent or close prolonged contact. Nasopharyngeal carriage of meningococci is unusual in infants and young children. However, up to 25% of adolescents and 5 - 11% of adults naturally carry the bacteria without manifesting any signs or symptoms of the disease (known as carriers). What triggers the disease to develop in a susceptible person-is unknown.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Health and Children. Office for Health Gain.en_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENTen_GB
dc.subjectMENINGITISen_GB
dc.subjectCOMMUNICABLE DISEASEen_GB
dc.subjectEPIDEMICen_GB
dc.titleMeningococcal C vaccine: Meninigitis C: facts for the healthcare professions.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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