The experiences of minority ethnic women living with HIV

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575064
Title:
The experiences of minority ethnic women living with HIV
Authors:
Cairde [Challenging ethnic minority health inequalities]
Citation:
Cairde [Challenging ethnic minority health inequalities. 2004. The experiences of minority ethnic women living with HIV. Dublin: Cairde.
Publisher:
Cairde
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575064
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
At the global level, women are among the poorest of the poor, with access to the fewest resources and opportunities. They are frequently economically dependent on male partners. In Ireland, 70% of women interviewed are financially dependent on social welfare, as their legal status does not allow them to work despite their desire to do so. For many, their legal status as asylum seekers or refugees is a major economic constraint and a constant source of worry. Financial dependency and limited resources prevent them from maintaining an adequate diet essential to their health, and limit their ability to provide nappies, clothes and food for their children. Global inequities and local economic dependencies must be challenged, and Cairde recommends allowing asylum seekers to take up employment after six months in the asylum process, developing a mechanism to assess equivalence of qualitications gained overseas, and faCilitating a gradual rather than sudden withdrawal of social welfare entitlements upon finding work, which will case women's financial transition.
Keywords:
ETHNIC GROUP; EDUCATION; FINANCE; HEALTH; HIV INFECTION
ISBN:
0953630412

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCairde [Challenging ethnic minority health inequalities]en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-18T12:02:36Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-18T12:02:36Zen
dc.date.issued2004en
dc.identifier.citationCairde [Challenging ethnic minority health inequalities. 2004. The experiences of minority ethnic women living with HIV. Dublin: Cairde.en
dc.identifier.isbn0953630412en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/575064en
dc.descriptionAt the global level, women are among the poorest of the poor, with access to the fewest resources and opportunities. They are frequently economically dependent on male partners. In Ireland, 70% of women interviewed are financially dependent on social welfare, as their legal status does not allow them to work despite their desire to do so. For many, their legal status as asylum seekers or refugees is a major economic constraint and a constant source of worry. Financial dependency and limited resources prevent them from maintaining an adequate diet essential to their health, and limit their ability to provide nappies, clothes and food for their children. Global inequities and local economic dependencies must be challenged, and Cairde recommends allowing asylum seekers to take up employment after six months in the asylum process, developing a mechanism to assess equivalence of qualitications gained overseas, and faCilitating a gradual rather than sudden withdrawal of social welfare entitlements upon finding work, which will case women's financial transition.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCairdeen
dc.subjectETHNIC GROUPen
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen
dc.subjectFINANCEen
dc.subjectHEALTHen
dc.subjectHIV INFECTIONen
dc.titleThe experiences of minority ethnic women living with HIVen
dc.typeReporten
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