The IFPA (Irish Family Planning Association) Report. 1997. Making a difference.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575020
Title:
The IFPA (Irish Family Planning Association) Report. 1997. Making a difference.
Authors:
Irish Family Planning Association (IFPA)
Citation:
Irish Family Planning Association. 1997. The IFPA (Irish Family Planning Association) Report. 1997. Making a difference. Dublin: Irish Family Planning Association (IFPA)
Publisher:
Irish Family Planning Association (IFPA)
Issue Date:
Nov-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/575020
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Looking back over the years since 1969, when the IFPA was founded by a group of brave women and men, il is now possible to chart steady and constonl progress towards their goal of 'every child a wanted child '. These years have often seen tough and threatening times for the Association as it faced an endless series of struggles against censorship, shortages of funds and even criminal charges. Those who committed themselves to the associations' work, and who often went out on a limb personally, did so because they believed that what they were doing would make a difference. The hard work and dedication of the IFPA's volunteers and staff in the last 28 years has indeed made a difference. The Ireland of today is a very different place to the Ireland of 1969. Nowhere is this more marked than in the field of sexual and reproductive rights. The IFPA's current members are conscious of their inheritance. A series of achievements have ensured that our predecessors have left an indelible mark on Irish society. These include: • establishing the first fomily planning clinics in Ireland; • overcoming censorship laws to publish contraception information; • forcing the legalisation of medical contraceptives; • forcing the repeal of restrictive condom laws, through the Virgin condom case; • breaking the silence on HIV and AIDS in Ireland with the film 'Stories from the Silence' • using EU law to re-introduce non-directive pregnancy counselling to Ireland in 1992; Catherine Forde • ensuring the inclusion of family planning in the Government's health strategy in 1994; • persuading the government to introduce guidelines and teacher training for Relationships and Sexuality Education in schools
Keywords:
FAMILY PLANNING; CONTRACEPTION; FUNDING; HIV INFECTION; AIDS; CHILD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIrish Family Planning Association (IFPA)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-18T11:31:44Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-18T11:31:44Zen
dc.date.issued1997-11en
dc.identifier.citationIrish Family Planning Association. 1997. The IFPA (Irish Family Planning Association) Report. 1997. Making a difference. Dublin: Irish Family Planning Association (IFPA)en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/575020en
dc.descriptionLooking back over the years since 1969, when the IFPA was founded by a group of brave women and men, il is now possible to chart steady and constonl progress towards their goal of 'every child a wanted child '. These years have often seen tough and threatening times for the Association as it faced an endless series of struggles against censorship, shortages of funds and even criminal charges. Those who committed themselves to the associations' work, and who often went out on a limb personally, did so because they believed that what they were doing would make a difference. The hard work and dedication of the IFPA's volunteers and staff in the last 28 years has indeed made a difference. The Ireland of today is a very different place to the Ireland of 1969. Nowhere is this more marked than in the field of sexual and reproductive rights. The IFPA's current members are conscious of their inheritance. A series of achievements have ensured that our predecessors have left an indelible mark on Irish society. These include: • establishing the first fomily planning clinics in Ireland; • overcoming censorship laws to publish contraception information; • forcing the legalisation of medical contraceptives; • forcing the repeal of restrictive condom laws, through the Virgin condom case; • breaking the silence on HIV and AIDS in Ireland with the film 'Stories from the Silence' • using EU law to re-introduce non-directive pregnancy counselling to Ireland in 1992; Catherine Forde • ensuring the inclusion of family planning in the Government's health strategy in 1994; • persuading the government to introduce guidelines and teacher training for Relationships and Sexuality Education in schoolsen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Family Planning Association (IFPA)en
dc.subjectFAMILY PLANNINGen
dc.subjectCONTRACEPTIONen
dc.subjectFUNDINGen
dc.subjectHIV INFECTIONen
dc.subjectAIDSen
dc.subjectCHILDen
dc.titleThe IFPA (Irish Family Planning Association) Report. 1997. Making a difference.en
dc.typeReporten
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