Randomized controlled trial comparing telephone and mail follow-up for recruitment of participants into a clinical trial of colorectal cancer screening

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/574931
Title:
Randomized controlled trial comparing telephone and mail follow-up for recruitment of participants into a clinical trial of colorectal cancer screening
Authors:
Wong, Arthur D; Kirby, John; Guyatt, Gordon H; Moayyedi, Paul; Vora, Parag; You, John J
Citation:
Trials. 2013 Feb 11;14(1):40
Issue Date:
11-Feb-2013
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-14-40; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/574931
Abstract:
Abstract Background Investigators often face challenges when recruiting participants into randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Some data suggest that telephone reminders may lead to greater participant enrollment. Methods Patients aged 50 to 70 years from family practice rosters were initially mailed invitations to participate in an RCT of colorectal cancer screening. Patients who did not respond were randomly allocated to follow-up invitations by either telephone or mail four weeks after the initial invitation. The primary outcome was attendance for eligibility screening with the study nurse. Results After mailing invitations to 1,348 patients, 104 patients were initially enrolled in the RCT of colon cancer screening. Of 952 patients who did not respond to the initial mailed invitation, we randomly allocated 480 to follow-up invitation by telephone and 472 to follow-up invitation by mail. Attendance for eligibility screening with the study nurse was more frequent when non-responders were followed-up by telephone (84/480, 17.5%) than by mail (43/472, 9.1%) (relative risk (RR) 1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36 to 2.71, P < 0.001). Enrollment into the RCT was also greater among patients followed-up by telephone (59/480, 12.3%) compared to those followed-up by mail (35/472, 7.4%) (RR 1.66, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.47, P=0.01). Conclusions Telephone-based follow-up results in greater enrollment compared to a mail-based method. Our findings should be of interest to investigators conducting RCTs, particularly trials of screening interventions involving asymptomatic participants for which volunteer participation may be challenging. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00865527
Language:
en
Keywords:
CANCER, COLORECTAL; SCREENING

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWong, Arthur Den
dc.contributor.authorKirby, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorGuyatt, Gordon Hen
dc.contributor.authorMoayyedi, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorVora, Paragen
dc.contributor.authorYou, John Jen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-17T16:05:33Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-17T16:05:33Zen
dc.date.issued2013-02-11en
dc.identifier.citationTrials. 2013 Feb 11;14(1):40en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-14-40en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/574931en
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Investigators often face challenges when recruiting participants into randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Some data suggest that telephone reminders may lead to greater participant enrollment. Methods Patients aged 50 to 70 years from family practice rosters were initially mailed invitations to participate in an RCT of colorectal cancer screening. Patients who did not respond were randomly allocated to follow-up invitations by either telephone or mail four weeks after the initial invitation. The primary outcome was attendance for eligibility screening with the study nurse. Results After mailing invitations to 1,348 patients, 104 patients were initially enrolled in the RCT of colon cancer screening. Of 952 patients who did not respond to the initial mailed invitation, we randomly allocated 480 to follow-up invitation by telephone and 472 to follow-up invitation by mail. Attendance for eligibility screening with the study nurse was more frequent when non-responders were followed-up by telephone (84/480, 17.5%) than by mail (43/472, 9.1%) (relative risk (RR) 1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36 to 2.71, P < 0.001). Enrollment into the RCT was also greater among patients followed-up by telephone (59/480, 12.3%) compared to those followed-up by mail (35/472, 7.4%) (RR 1.66, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.47, P=0.01). Conclusions Telephone-based follow-up results in greater enrollment compared to a mail-based method. Our findings should be of interest to investigators conducting RCTs, particularly trials of screening interventions involving asymptomatic participants for which volunteer participation may be challenging. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00865527en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCANCER, COLORECTALen
dc.subjectSCREENINGen
dc.titleRandomized controlled trial comparing telephone and mail follow-up for recruitment of participants into a clinical trial of colorectal cancer screeningen
dc.language.rfc3066enen
dc.rights.holderWong et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en
dc.date.updated2015-08-14T13:21:08Zen
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