Current knowledge and future directions of TLR and NOD signaling in sepsis

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/574896
Title:
Current knowledge and future directions of TLR and NOD signaling in sepsis
Authors:
Foley, Niamh M; Wang, Jian; Redmond, H P; Wang, Jiang H
Citation:
Military Medical Research. 2015 Jan 07;2(1):1
Issue Date:
7-Jan-2015
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40779-014-0029-7; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/574896
Abstract:
Abstract The incidence of sepsis is increasing over time, along with an increased risk of dying from the condition. Sepsis care costs billions annually in the United States. Death from sepsis is understood to be a complex process, driven by a lack of normal immune homeostatic functions and excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines, which leads to multi-organ failure. The Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, one of whose members was initially discovered in Drosophila, performs an important role in the recognition of microbial pathogens. These pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), upon sensing invading microorganisms, activate intracellular signal transduction pathways. NOD signaling is also involved in the recognition of bacteria and acts synergistically with the TLR family in initiating an efficient immune response for the eradication of invading microbial pathogens. TLRs and NOD1/NOD2 respond to different pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Modulation of both TLR and NOD signaling is an area of research that has prompted much excitement and debate as a therapeutic strategy in the management of sepsis. Molecules targeting TLR and NOD signaling pathways exist but regrettably thus far none have proven efficacy from clinical trials.
Language:
en
Keywords:
SEPSIS; MOLECULAR BIOLOGY; INFECTION CONTROL

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFoley, Niamh Men
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jianen
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Pen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jiang Hen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-17T14:30:59Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-17T14:30:59Zen
dc.date.issued2015-01-07en
dc.identifier.citationMilitary Medical Research. 2015 Jan 07;2(1):1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40779-014-0029-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/574896en
dc.description.abstractAbstract The incidence of sepsis is increasing over time, along with an increased risk of dying from the condition. Sepsis care costs billions annually in the United States. Death from sepsis is understood to be a complex process, driven by a lack of normal immune homeostatic functions and excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines, which leads to multi-organ failure. The Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, one of whose members was initially discovered in Drosophila, performs an important role in the recognition of microbial pathogens. These pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), upon sensing invading microorganisms, activate intracellular signal transduction pathways. NOD signaling is also involved in the recognition of bacteria and acts synergistically with the TLR family in initiating an efficient immune response for the eradication of invading microbial pathogens. TLRs and NOD1/NOD2 respond to different pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Modulation of both TLR and NOD signaling is an area of research that has prompted much excitement and debate as a therapeutic strategy in the management of sepsis. Molecules targeting TLR and NOD signaling pathways exist but regrettably thus far none have proven efficacy from clinical trials.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectSEPSISen
dc.subjectMOLECULAR BIOLOGYen
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen
dc.titleCurrent knowledge and future directions of TLR and NOD signaling in sepsisen
dc.language.rfc3066enen
dc.rights.holderFoley et al.; licensee BioMed Central.en
dc.date.updated2015-08-14T13:20:41Zen
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.