Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/574895
Title:
Medical Council final term report 1987-1989
Authors:
Medical Council
Citation:
Medical Council. 1990. Medical Council final term report 1987-1989. Dublin: Medical Council.
Publisher:
Medical Council
Issue Date:
Dec-1990
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/574895
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The basic function of the Medical Council is the maintenance of the Register. The purpose of this is to protect the public by enabling it to distinguish between qualified and unqualified practitioners, and the disciplinary, educational and ethical functions of the Council are geared towards ensuring that a doctor who is on the Register - be it one who is fully, provisionally or temporarily registered as a doctor to whom the public can turn with confidence. No problem arises with those doctors who graduate in Ireland, because the Medical Practitioners Act gives the Council the power to control the standards of the teaching and examinations of the Irish Medical Schools. Equally, under the Treaty of Rome any doctor who graduates in a School within the Community has the right, given clearance by his or her registering authority, to become fully registered in Ireland. An Irish medical graduate has a similar right to registration in any of the other Member States, again given clearance by the Council. What is not generally recognised, and this has given rise to widespread misunderstanding, is that this right depends basically on the place of qualification and not on nationality. Even a native-born Irish citizen who qualifies from a Medical School situated outside the Community, which is not recognised by the Council, has not the right to registration in this country. This is one of the obligations imposed on us by membership of the Community, and its application in all the Member States is very closely monitored by the Conference des Ordres the co-ordinating body for all the registering authorities. It might also be pointed out that there are few, if any, countries outside the European Communities in which Irish graduates may enter practice without very stringent entry requirements, usually including an examination, and in some they may not be able to practise at all.
Keywords:
GENERAL PRACTITIONER; EDUCATION; REGULATION; TEACHER

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMedical Councilen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-17T14:28:18Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-17T14:28:18Zen
dc.date.issued1990-12en
dc.identifier.citationMedical Council. 1990. Medical Council final term report 1987-1989. Dublin: Medical Council.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/574895en
dc.descriptionThe basic function of the Medical Council is the maintenance of the Register. The purpose of this is to protect the public by enabling it to distinguish between qualified and unqualified practitioners, and the disciplinary, educational and ethical functions of the Council are geared towards ensuring that a doctor who is on the Register - be it one who is fully, provisionally or temporarily registered as a doctor to whom the public can turn with confidence. No problem arises with those doctors who graduate in Ireland, because the Medical Practitioners Act gives the Council the power to control the standards of the teaching and examinations of the Irish Medical Schools. Equally, under the Treaty of Rome any doctor who graduates in a School within the Community has the right, given clearance by his or her registering authority, to become fully registered in Ireland. An Irish medical graduate has a similar right to registration in any of the other Member States, again given clearance by the Council. What is not generally recognised, and this has given rise to widespread misunderstanding, is that this right depends basically on the place of qualification and not on nationality. Even a native-born Irish citizen who qualifies from a Medical School situated outside the Community, which is not recognised by the Council, has not the right to registration in this country. This is one of the obligations imposed on us by membership of the Community, and its application in all the Member States is very closely monitored by the Conference des Ordres the co-ordinating body for all the registering authorities. It might also be pointed out that there are few, if any, countries outside the European Communities in which Irish graduates may enter practice without very stringent entry requirements, usually including an examination, and in some they may not be able to practise at all.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMedical Councilen
dc.subjectGENERAL PRACTITIONERen
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen
dc.subjectREGULATIONen
dc.subjectTEACHERen
dc.titleMedical Council final term report 1987-1989en
dc.typeReporten
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