Structured sedation programs in the emergency department, hospital and other acute settings: protocol for systematic review of effects and events

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/567327
Title:
Structured sedation programs in the emergency department, hospital and other acute settings: protocol for systematic review of effects and events
Authors:
McCoy, Siobhán; Wakai, Abel; Blackburn, Carol; Barrett, Michael; Murphy, Adrian; Brenner, Maria; Larkin, Philip; Crispino-O’Connell, Gloria; Ratnapalan, Savithiri; O’Sullivan, Ronan
Citation:
Systematic Reviews. 2013 Oct 01;2(1):89
Issue Date:
1-Oct-2013
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2046-4053-2-89; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/567327
Abstract:
Abstract Background The use of procedural sedation outside the operating theatre has increased in hospital settings and has gained popularity among non-anesthesiologists. Sedative agents used for procedural pain, although effective, also pose significant risks to the patient if used incorrectly. There is currently no universally accepted program of education for practitioners using or introducing procedural sedation into their practice. There is emerging literature identifying structured procedural sedation programs (PSPs) as a method of ensuring a standardized level of competency among staff and reducing risks to the patient. We hypothesize that programs of education for healthcare professionals using procedural sedation outside the operating theatre are beneficial in improving patient care, safety, practitioner competence and reducing adverse event rates. Methods/Design Electronic databases will be systematically searched for studies (randomized and non-randomized) examining the effectiveness of structured PSPs from 1966 to present. Database searches will be supplemented by contact with experts, reference and citation checking, and a grey literature search. No language restriction will be imposed. Screening of titles and abstracts, and data extraction will be performed by two independent reviewers. All disagreements will be resolved by discussion with an independent third party. Data analysis will be completed adhering to procedures outlined in the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews of Interventions. If the data allows, a meta-analysis will be performed. Discussion This review will cohere evidence on the effectiveness of structured PSPs on sedation events and patient outcomes within the hospital and other acute care settings. In addition, it will examine key components identified within a PSP associated with patient safety and improved patient outcomes. Trial registration PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013003851
Language:
en
Keywords:
SEDATION; ACUTE CARE; EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE; ANALGESIA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcCoy, Siobhánen
dc.contributor.authorWakai, Abelen
dc.contributor.authorBlackburn, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Adrianen
dc.contributor.authorBrenner, Mariaen
dc.contributor.authorLarkin, Philipen
dc.contributor.authorCrispino-O’Connell, Gloriaen
dc.contributor.authorRatnapalan, Savithirien
dc.contributor.authorO’Sullivan, Ronanen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-17T09:34:38Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-17T09:34:38Zen
dc.date.issued2013-10-01en
dc.identifier.citationSystematic Reviews. 2013 Oct 01;2(1):89en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2046-4053-2-89en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/567327en
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background The use of procedural sedation outside the operating theatre has increased in hospital settings and has gained popularity among non-anesthesiologists. Sedative agents used for procedural pain, although effective, also pose significant risks to the patient if used incorrectly. There is currently no universally accepted program of education for practitioners using or introducing procedural sedation into their practice. There is emerging literature identifying structured procedural sedation programs (PSPs) as a method of ensuring a standardized level of competency among staff and reducing risks to the patient. We hypothesize that programs of education for healthcare professionals using procedural sedation outside the operating theatre are beneficial in improving patient care, safety, practitioner competence and reducing adverse event rates. Methods/Design Electronic databases will be systematically searched for studies (randomized and non-randomized) examining the effectiveness of structured PSPs from 1966 to present. Database searches will be supplemented by contact with experts, reference and citation checking, and a grey literature search. No language restriction will be imposed. Screening of titles and abstracts, and data extraction will be performed by two independent reviewers. All disagreements will be resolved by discussion with an independent third party. Data analysis will be completed adhering to procedures outlined in the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews of Interventions. If the data allows, a meta-analysis will be performed. Discussion This review will cohere evidence on the effectiveness of structured PSPs on sedation events and patient outcomes within the hospital and other acute care settings. In addition, it will examine key components identified within a PSP associated with patient safety and improved patient outcomes. Trial registration PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013003851en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectSEDATIONen
dc.subjectACUTE CAREen
dc.subjectEMERGENCY MEDICAL CAREen
dc.subjectANALGESIAen
dc.titleStructured sedation programs in the emergency department, hospital and other acute settings: protocol for systematic review of effects and eventsen
dc.language.rfc3066enen
dc.rights.holderMcCoy et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en
dc.date.updated2015-08-14T13:26:41Zen
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