Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/565749
Title:
Infant nutrition in the first year of life
Authors:
Hunt, Dearbhla
Publisher:
Nursing in General Practice
Journal:
Nursing in General Practice
Issue Date:
Jul-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/565749
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The first year of life is a time of rapid growth and development. The infants weight doubles in the first six months of life and trebles in the first year whilst length doubles within the first year of life. During infancy, nutrient requirements per kg of body weight are higher than at any other time of life.1 Appropriate nutrition is essential to support the infant’s growth during this critical time in order to prevent stunting and wasting. Furthermore, research has shown that poor nutrition in the early months of life has long term implications. Neurological development, immune function, bone health, metabolism and cardiovascular health are all linked to early development and optimal nutrition in the early months of life.2 Whilst infants are born with stores as a result of pregnancy, these stores can be quickly depleted unless an adequate supply of nutrients is provided. Recommendations for nutrient requirements are set out by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI).3
Keywords:
INFANT; NUTRITION; NURSE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Dearbhlaen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-07T13:37:16Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-07T13:37:16Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/565749en
dc.descriptionThe first year of life is a time of rapid growth and development. The infants weight doubles in the first six months of life and trebles in the first year whilst length doubles within the first year of life. During infancy, nutrient requirements per kg of body weight are higher than at any other time of life.1 Appropriate nutrition is essential to support the infant’s growth during this critical time in order to prevent stunting and wasting. Furthermore, research has shown that poor nutrition in the early months of life has long term implications. Neurological development, immune function, bone health, metabolism and cardiovascular health are all linked to early development and optimal nutrition in the early months of life.2 Whilst infants are born with stores as a result of pregnancy, these stores can be quickly depleted unless an adequate supply of nutrients is provided. Recommendations for nutrient requirements are set out by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI).3en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNursing in General Practiceen
dc.subjectINFANTen
dc.subjectNUTRITIONen
dc.subjectNURSEen
dc.titleInfant nutrition in the first year of lifeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNursing in General Practiceen
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