Use of asthma medication during pregnancy and risk of specific congenital anomalies: A European case-malformed control study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/565745
Title:
Use of asthma medication during pregnancy and risk of specific congenital anomalies: A European case-malformed control study.
Authors:
Garne, Ester; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Morris, Joan; Zaupper, Louise; Addor, Marie-Claude; Barisic, Ingeborg; Gatt, Miriam; Lelong, Nathalie; Klungsøyr, Kari; O'Mahony, Mary; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; Pierini, Anna; Tucker, David; de Walle, Hermien; Wiesel, Awi; Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen
Affiliation:
10 Department of Public Health, Health Service Executive South, Ireland.
Citation:
Use of asthma medication during pregnancy and risk of specific congenital anomalies: A European case-malformed control study. 2015: J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology
Issue Date:
25-Jul-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/565745
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2015.05.043
PubMed ID:
26220526
Abstract:
Pregnant women with asthma need to take medication during pregnancy.; We sought to identify whether there is an increased risk of specific congenital anomalies after exposure to antiasthma medication in the first trimester of pregnancy.; We performed a population-based case-malformed control study testing signals identified in a literature review. Odds ratios (ORs) of exposure to the main groups of asthma medication were calculated for each of the 10 signal anomalies compared with registrations with nonchromosomal, nonsignal anomalies as control registrations. In addition, exploratory analyses were done for each nonsignal anomaly. The data set included 76,249 registrations of congenital anomalies from 13 EUROmediCAT registries.; Cleft palate (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.05-2.52) and gastroschisis (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.12-3.20) had significantly increased odds of exposure to first-trimester use of inhaled β2-agonists compared with nonchromosomal control registrations. Odds of exposure to salbutamol were similar. Nonsignificant ORs of exposure to inhaled β2-agonists were found for spina bifida, cleft lip, anal atresia, severe congenital heart defects in general, or tetralogy of Fallot. None of the 4 literature signals of exposure to inhaled steroids were confirmed (cleft palate, cleft lip, anal atresia, and hypospadias). Exploratory analyses found an association between renal dysplasia and exposure to the combination of long-acting β2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (OR, 3.95; 95% CI, 1.99-7.85).; The study confirmed increased odds of first-trimester exposure to inhaled β2-agonists for cleft palate and gastroschisis and found a potential new signal for renal dysplasia associated with combined long-acting β2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids. Use of inhaled corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy seems to be safe in relation to the risk for a range of specific major congenital anomalies.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
BACKGROUND: Pregnant women with asthma need to take medication during pregnancy. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify whether there is an increased risk of specific congenital anomalies after exposure to antiasthma medication in the first trimester of pregnancy. METHODS: We performed a population-based case-malformed control study testing signals identified in a literature review. Odds ratios (ORs) of exposure to the main groups of asthma medication were calculated for each of the 10 signal anomalies compared with registrations with nonchromosomal, nonsignal anomalies as control registrations. In addition, exploratory analyses were done for each nonsignal anomaly. The data set included 76,249 registrations of congenital anomalies from 13 EUROmediCAT registries. RESULTS: Cleft palate (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.05-2.52) and gastroschisis (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.12-3.20) had significantly increased odds of exposure to first-trimester use of inhaled β2-agonists compared with nonchromosomal control registrations. Odds of exposure to salbutamol were similar. Nonsignificant ORs of exposure to inhaled β2-agonists were found for spina bifida, cleft lip, anal atresia, severe congenital heart defects in general, or tetralogy of Fallot. None of the 4 literature signals of exposure to inhaled steroids were confirmed (cleft palate, cleft lip, anal atresia, and hypospadias). Exploratory analyses found an association between renal dysplasia and exposure to the combination of long-acting β2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (OR, 3.95; 95% CI, 1.99-7.85). CONCLUSIONS: The study confirmed increased odds of first-trimester exposure to inhaled β2-agonists for cleft palate and gastroschisis and found a potential new signal for renal dysplasia associated with combined long-acting β2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids. Use of inhaled corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy seems to be safe in relation to the risk for a range of specific major congenital anomalies.
Keywords:
ASTHMA; MEDICATION; PREGNANCY
Local subject classification:
PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT; HEALTH IMPROVEMENT; CONGENITAL ANOMALIES
ISSN:
1097-6825

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGarne, Esteren
dc.contributor.authorHansen, Anne Vinkelen
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Joanen
dc.contributor.authorZaupper, Louiseen
dc.contributor.authorAddor, Marie-Claudeen
dc.contributor.authorBarisic, Ingeborgen
dc.contributor.authorGatt, Miriamen
dc.contributor.authorLelong, Nathalieen
dc.contributor.authorKlungsøyr, Karien
dc.contributor.authorO'Mahony, Maryen
dc.contributor.authorNelen, Veraen
dc.contributor.authorNeville, Amanda Jen
dc.contributor.authorPierini, Annaen
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorde Walle, Hermienen
dc.contributor.authorWiesel, Awien
dc.contributor.authorLoane, Mariaen
dc.contributor.authorDolk, Helenen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-07T13:31:34Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-07T13:31:34Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07-25en
dc.identifier.citationUse of asthma medication during pregnancy and risk of specific congenital anomalies: A European case-malformed control study. 2015: J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.en
dc.identifier.issn1097-6825en
dc.identifier.pmid26220526en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jaci.2015.05.043en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/565745en
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND: Pregnant women with asthma need to take medication during pregnancy. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify whether there is an increased risk of specific congenital anomalies after exposure to antiasthma medication in the first trimester of pregnancy. METHODS: We performed a population-based case-malformed control study testing signals identified in a literature review. Odds ratios (ORs) of exposure to the main groups of asthma medication were calculated for each of the 10 signal anomalies compared with registrations with nonchromosomal, nonsignal anomalies as control registrations. In addition, exploratory analyses were done for each nonsignal anomaly. The data set included 76,249 registrations of congenital anomalies from 13 EUROmediCAT registries. RESULTS: Cleft palate (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.05-2.52) and gastroschisis (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.12-3.20) had significantly increased odds of exposure to first-trimester use of inhaled β2-agonists compared with nonchromosomal control registrations. Odds of exposure to salbutamol were similar. Nonsignificant ORs of exposure to inhaled β2-agonists were found for spina bifida, cleft lip, anal atresia, severe congenital heart defects in general, or tetralogy of Fallot. None of the 4 literature signals of exposure to inhaled steroids were confirmed (cleft palate, cleft lip, anal atresia, and hypospadias). Exploratory analyses found an association between renal dysplasia and exposure to the combination of long-acting β2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (OR, 3.95; 95% CI, 1.99-7.85). CONCLUSIONS: The study confirmed increased odds of first-trimester exposure to inhaled β2-agonists for cleft palate and gastroschisis and found a potential new signal for renal dysplasia associated with combined long-acting β2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids. Use of inhaled corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy seems to be safe in relation to the risk for a range of specific major congenital anomalies.en
dc.description.abstractPregnant women with asthma need to take medication during pregnancy.en
dc.description.abstractWe sought to identify whether there is an increased risk of specific congenital anomalies after exposure to antiasthma medication in the first trimester of pregnancy.en
dc.description.abstractWe performed a population-based case-malformed control study testing signals identified in a literature review. Odds ratios (ORs) of exposure to the main groups of asthma medication were calculated for each of the 10 signal anomalies compared with registrations with nonchromosomal, nonsignal anomalies as control registrations. In addition, exploratory analyses were done for each nonsignal anomaly. The data set included 76,249 registrations of congenital anomalies from 13 EUROmediCAT registries.en
dc.description.abstractCleft palate (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.05-2.52) and gastroschisis (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.12-3.20) had significantly increased odds of exposure to first-trimester use of inhaled β2-agonists compared with nonchromosomal control registrations. Odds of exposure to salbutamol were similar. Nonsignificant ORs of exposure to inhaled β2-agonists were found for spina bifida, cleft lip, anal atresia, severe congenital heart defects in general, or tetralogy of Fallot. None of the 4 literature signals of exposure to inhaled steroids were confirmed (cleft palate, cleft lip, anal atresia, and hypospadias). Exploratory analyses found an association between renal dysplasia and exposure to the combination of long-acting β2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (OR, 3.95; 95% CI, 1.99-7.85).en
dc.description.abstractThe study confirmed increased odds of first-trimester exposure to inhaled β2-agonists for cleft palate and gastroschisis and found a potential new signal for renal dysplasia associated with combined long-acting β2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids. Use of inhaled corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy seems to be safe in relation to the risk for a range of specific major congenital anomalies.en
dc.languageENGen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of allergy and clinical immunologyen
dc.subjectASTHMAen
dc.subjectMEDICATIONen
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENTen
dc.subject.otherHEALTH IMPROVEMENTen
dc.subject.otherCONGENITAL ANOMALIESen
dc.titleUse of asthma medication during pregnancy and risk of specific congenital anomalies: A European case-malformed control study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department10 Department of Public Health, Health Service Executive South, Ireland.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of allergy and clinical immunologyen

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