Population-based study of smoking behaviour throughout pregnancy and adverse perinatal outcomes.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/565742
Title:
Population-based study of smoking behaviour throughout pregnancy and adverse perinatal outcomes.
Authors:
Murphy, Deirdre J; Dunney, Clare; Mullally, Aoife; Adnan, Nita; Deane, Richard
Citation:
Population-based study of smoking behaviour throughout pregnancy and adverse perinatal outcomes. 2013, 10 (9):3855-67 Int J Environ Res Public Health
Journal:
International journal of environmental research and public health
Issue Date:
Sep-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/565742
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph10093855
PubMed ID:
23985771
Additional Links:
http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/10/9/3855
Abstract:
There has been limited research addressing whether behavioural change in relation to smoking is maintained throughout pregnancy and the effect on perinatal outcomes. A cohort study addressed lifestyle behaviours of 907 women who booked for antenatal care and delivered in a large urban teaching hospital in 2010-2011. Adverse perinatal outcomes were compared for "non-smokers", "ex-smokers" and "current smokers". Of the 907 women, 270 (30%) reported smoking in the six months prior to pregnancy, and of those 160 (59%) had stopped smoking and 110 (41%) continued to smoke at the time of the first antenatal visit. There was virtually no change in smoking behaviour between the first antenatal visit and the third trimester of pregnancy. Factors associated with continuing to smoke included unplanned pregnancy (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.3, 2.9), alcohol use (OR 3.4; 95% CI 2.1, 6.0) and previous illicit drug use (OR 3.6; 95% CI 2.1, 6.0). Ex-smokers had similar perinatal outcomes to non-smokers. Current smoking was associated with an average reduction in birth weight of 191 g (95% CI -294, -88) and an increased incidence of intrauterine growth restriction (24% versus 13%, adjusted OR 1.39 (95% CI 1.06, 1.84). Public Health campaigns emphasise the health benefits of quitting smoking in pregnancy. The greatest success appears to be pre-pregnancy and during the first trimester where women are largely self-motivated to quit.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Birth Weight; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation; Humans; Ireland; Life Style; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Prospective Studies; Risk Reduction Behavior; Smoking; Smoking Cessation; Young Adult
ISSN:
1660-4601

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Deirdre Jen
dc.contributor.authorDunney, Clareen
dc.contributor.authorMullally, Aoifeen
dc.contributor.authorAdnan, Nitaen
dc.contributor.authorDeane, Richarden
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-07T13:28:41Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-07T13:28:41Zen
dc.date.issued2013-09en
dc.identifier.citationPopulation-based study of smoking behaviour throughout pregnancy and adverse perinatal outcomes. 2013, 10 (9):3855-67 Int J Environ Res Public Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601en
dc.identifier.pmid23985771en
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph10093855en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/565742en
dc.description.abstractThere has been limited research addressing whether behavioural change in relation to smoking is maintained throughout pregnancy and the effect on perinatal outcomes. A cohort study addressed lifestyle behaviours of 907 women who booked for antenatal care and delivered in a large urban teaching hospital in 2010-2011. Adverse perinatal outcomes were compared for "non-smokers", "ex-smokers" and "current smokers". Of the 907 women, 270 (30%) reported smoking in the six months prior to pregnancy, and of those 160 (59%) had stopped smoking and 110 (41%) continued to smoke at the time of the first antenatal visit. There was virtually no change in smoking behaviour between the first antenatal visit and the third trimester of pregnancy. Factors associated with continuing to smoke included unplanned pregnancy (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.3, 2.9), alcohol use (OR 3.4; 95% CI 2.1, 6.0) and previous illicit drug use (OR 3.6; 95% CI 2.1, 6.0). Ex-smokers had similar perinatal outcomes to non-smokers. Current smoking was associated with an average reduction in birth weight of 191 g (95% CI -294, -88) and an increased incidence of intrauterine growth restriction (24% versus 13%, adjusted OR 1.39 (95% CI 1.06, 1.84). Public Health campaigns emphasise the health benefits of quitting smoking in pregnancy. The greatest success appears to be pre-pregnancy and during the first trimester where women are largely self-motivated to quit.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/10/9/3855en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of environmental research and public healthen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBirth Weighten
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFetal Growth Retardationen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIrelanden
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcomeen
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Reduction Behavioren
dc.subject.meshSmokingen
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessationen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titlePopulation-based study of smoking behaviour throughout pregnancy and adverse perinatal outcomes.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of environmental research and public healthen
dc.description.fundingOtheren
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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