Nanotechnologies for the study of the central nervous system.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/565723
Title:
Nanotechnologies for the study of the central nervous system.
Authors:
Ajetunmobi, A; Prina-Mello, A; Volkov, Y; Corvin, A; Tropea, D
Citation:
Nanotechnologies for the study of the central nervous system. 2014, 123:18-36 Prog. Neurobiol.
Journal:
Progress in neurobiology
Issue Date:
Dec-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/565723
DOI:
10.1016/j.pneurobio.2014.09.004
PubMed ID:
25291406
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030100821400104X
Abstract:
The impact of central nervous system (CNS) disorders on the human population is significant, contributing almost €800 billion in annual European healthcare costs. These disorders not only have a disabling social impact but also a crippling economic drain on resources. Developing novel therapeutic strategies for these disorders requires a better understanding of events that underlie mechanisms of neural circuit physiology. Studying the relationship between genetic expression, synapse development and circuit physiology in CNS function is a challenging task, involving simultaneous analysis of multiple parameters and the convergence of several disciplines and technological approaches. However, current gold-standard techniques used to study the CNS have limitations that pose unique challenges to furthering our understanding of functional CNS development. The recent advancement in nanotechnologies for biomedical applications has seen the emergence of nanoscience as a key enabling technology for delivering a translational bridge between basic and clinical research. In particular, the development of neuroimaging and electrophysiology tools to identify the aetiology and progression of CNS disorders have led to new insights in our understanding of CNS physiology and the development of novel diagnostic modalities for therapeutic intervention. This review focuses on the latest applications of these nanotechnologies for investigating CNS function and the improved diagnosis of CNS disorders.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Animals; Biosensing Techniques; Brain; Contrast Media; Humans; Image Enhancement; Nanoparticles; Nanotechnology; Particle Size
ISSN:
1873-5118

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAjetunmobi, Aen
dc.contributor.authorPrina-Mello, Aen
dc.contributor.authorVolkov, Yen
dc.contributor.authorCorvin, Aen
dc.contributor.authorTropea, Den
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-07T13:31:00Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-07T13:31:00Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12en
dc.identifier.citationNanotechnologies for the study of the central nervous system. 2014, 123:18-36 Prog. Neurobiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1873-5118en
dc.identifier.pmid25291406en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pneurobio.2014.09.004en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/565723en
dc.description.abstractThe impact of central nervous system (CNS) disorders on the human population is significant, contributing almost €800 billion in annual European healthcare costs. These disorders not only have a disabling social impact but also a crippling economic drain on resources. Developing novel therapeutic strategies for these disorders requires a better understanding of events that underlie mechanisms of neural circuit physiology. Studying the relationship between genetic expression, synapse development and circuit physiology in CNS function is a challenging task, involving simultaneous analysis of multiple parameters and the convergence of several disciplines and technological approaches. However, current gold-standard techniques used to study the CNS have limitations that pose unique challenges to furthering our understanding of functional CNS development. The recent advancement in nanotechnologies for biomedical applications has seen the emergence of nanoscience as a key enabling technology for delivering a translational bridge between basic and clinical research. In particular, the development of neuroimaging and electrophysiology tools to identify the aetiology and progression of CNS disorders have led to new insights in our understanding of CNS physiology and the development of novel diagnostic modalities for therapeutic intervention. This review focuses on the latest applications of these nanotechnologies for investigating CNS function and the improved diagnosis of CNS disorders.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030100821400104Xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Progress in neurobiologyen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshBiosensing Techniquesen
dc.subject.meshBrainen
dc.subject.meshContrast Mediaen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImage Enhancementen
dc.subject.meshNanoparticlesen
dc.subject.meshNanotechnologyen
dc.subject.meshParticle Sizeen
dc.titleNanotechnologies for the study of the central nervous system.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalProgress in neurobiologyen
dc.description.fundingHEA Higher Education Authorityen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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