Tobacco endgame – you can quit and we can help

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/560497
Title:
Tobacco endgame – you can quit and we can help
Authors:
Browne, Fidelma; O'Brien, Sarah
Affiliation:
Health Service Executive
Publisher:
Health Service Executive
Issue Date:
Jun-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/560497
Item Type:
Conference Presentation
Language:
en
Description:
The Department of Health in Ireland, in their policy document Tobacco Free Ireland 2015 to 2025 provide the following context and background for tobacco control actions in Ireland(1) Smoking is leading risk factor for premature mortality in the WHO European Region, causing about 1.6 million deaths a year. It causes 1 in every 2 long-term smokers to die prematurely from smoking related diseases and is a major cause of morbidity with smoker on average losing at least 10 quality years of life. It is expected that by 2030 tobacco smoking will kill 10 million people globally per year, half of whom will be aged between 35 and 69. The World Bank estimates that if the number of adult smokers halved by 2020 there would be 200 million less tobacco related deaths worldwide by 2050. In Ireland, tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death. Each year at least 5,200 people die from disease caused by tobacco use. This represents approximately 19% of all deaths. An EU study has estimated that Irish health expenditure on smoking-related diseases was approximately €500 million in 2009. That study also estimated that productivity losses and long-term incapacity due to smoking-related diseases cost the Irish state over €160 million in 2009. That study estimated that the costs to Ireland of premature mortality due to smoking-related diseases was over €3,500 million in 2009. The average cost per admission of treating a smoker in an in-patient setting for a tobacco related illness is €7,700. A health economic assessment found that for every 1,000 smokers who quit there was an average saving of Aus$373,000 (€277,370) in healthcare costs associated with acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Ireland has a successful record in tobacco control and is regarded internationally as a leader in this area. While the Tobacco Control Scale 2010 in Europe, published in March 2011, ranks Ireland second out of 30 European countries in terms of tobacco control, it also highlight that there was significant scope for improvement in the area of social marketing campaigns and cessation support. However, while the level of tobacco use in the population is slowly declining – just under 20% in the general population, the significant impact tobacco use has on health and well-being means that tobacco control continues to be a priority issue for the Irish government and health service (HSE). In 2013, the Irish government launched the Tobacco Free Ireland policy and action plan which is designed to promote and move towards a tobacco free society by 2025, with a target of smoking prevalence of 5% or less. Based on the internationally recognised MPOWER model there are over 60 recommendations in Tobacco Free Ireland(1). The MPOWER model has six key strands: • Monitor Tobacco Use and Prevention Policies • Protect People from Tobacco Smoke • Offer Help to Quit Tobacco Use • Warn about the Dangers of Tobacco • Enforce Bans on Tobacco Advertising, Promotion and Sponsorship • Raise Taxes on Tobacco Products The HSE QUIT media campaign and QUIT cessation support service are part of a broad suite of measures that form part of the tobacco control landscape in Ireland. The Health Service Executive (HSE) is Ireland’s national health service provider and has lead responsibility for the actions under the two themes highlighted above.
Keywords:
SMOKING CESSATION; HEALTH PROMOTION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Fidelmaen
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Sarahen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-15T16:00:09Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-15T16:00:09Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/560497en
dc.descriptionThe Department of Health in Ireland, in their policy document Tobacco Free Ireland 2015 to 2025 provide the following context and background for tobacco control actions in Ireland(1) Smoking is leading risk factor for premature mortality in the WHO European Region, causing about 1.6 million deaths a year. It causes 1 in every 2 long-term smokers to die prematurely from smoking related diseases and is a major cause of morbidity with smoker on average losing at least 10 quality years of life. It is expected that by 2030 tobacco smoking will kill 10 million people globally per year, half of whom will be aged between 35 and 69. The World Bank estimates that if the number of adult smokers halved by 2020 there would be 200 million less tobacco related deaths worldwide by 2050. In Ireland, tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death. Each year at least 5,200 people die from disease caused by tobacco use. This represents approximately 19% of all deaths. An EU study has estimated that Irish health expenditure on smoking-related diseases was approximately €500 million in 2009. That study also estimated that productivity losses and long-term incapacity due to smoking-related diseases cost the Irish state over €160 million in 2009. That study estimated that the costs to Ireland of premature mortality due to smoking-related diseases was over €3,500 million in 2009. The average cost per admission of treating a smoker in an in-patient setting for a tobacco related illness is €7,700. A health economic assessment found that for every 1,000 smokers who quit there was an average saving of Aus$373,000 (€277,370) in healthcare costs associated with acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Ireland has a successful record in tobacco control and is regarded internationally as a leader in this area. While the Tobacco Control Scale 2010 in Europe, published in March 2011, ranks Ireland second out of 30 European countries in terms of tobacco control, it also highlight that there was significant scope for improvement in the area of social marketing campaigns and cessation support. However, while the level of tobacco use in the population is slowly declining – just under 20% in the general population, the significant impact tobacco use has on health and well-being means that tobacco control continues to be a priority issue for the Irish government and health service (HSE). In 2013, the Irish government launched the Tobacco Free Ireland policy and action plan which is designed to promote and move towards a tobacco free society by 2025, with a target of smoking prevalence of 5% or less. Based on the internationally recognised MPOWER model there are over 60 recommendations in Tobacco Free Ireland(1). The MPOWER model has six key strands: • Monitor Tobacco Use and Prevention Policies • Protect People from Tobacco Smoke • Offer Help to Quit Tobacco Use • Warn about the Dangers of Tobacco • Enforce Bans on Tobacco Advertising, Promotion and Sponsorship • Raise Taxes on Tobacco Products The HSE QUIT media campaign and QUIT cessation support service are part of a broad suite of measures that form part of the tobacco control landscape in Ireland. The Health Service Executive (HSE) is Ireland’s national health service provider and has lead responsibility for the actions under the two themes highlighted above.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executiveen
dc.subjectSMOKING CESSATIONen
dc.subjectHEALTH PROMOTIONen
dc.titleTobacco endgame – you can quit and we can helpen
dc.typeConference Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Service Executiveen
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