Child maltreatment and adult psychopathology in an Irish context.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/560488
Title:
Child maltreatment and adult psychopathology in an Irish context.
Authors:
Fitzhenry, Mark; Harte, Elizabeth; Carr, Alan; Keenleyside, Mairi; O'Hanrahan, Kevin; White, Megan Daly; Hayes, Jennifer; Cahill, Paul; Noonan, Hester; O'Shea, Helen; McCullagh, Avril; McGuinness, Shaun; Rodgers, Catherine; Whelan, Neal; Sheppard, Noel; Browne, Stephen
Citation:
Child maltreatment and adult psychopathology in an Irish context. 2015, 45:101-7 Child Abuse Negl
Publisher:
Child abuse & neglect
Journal:
Child abuse & neglect
Issue Date:
Jul-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/560488
DOI:
10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.04.021
PubMed ID:
26026360
Abstract:
One-hundred-ninety-nine adult mental health service users were interviewed with a protocol that included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Structured Clinical Interviews for Axis I and II DSM-IV disorders, the Global Assessment of Functioning scale, the SCORE family assessment measure, the Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule, and the Readiness for Psychotherapy Index. Compared to a U.S. normative sample, Irish clinical cases had higher levels of maltreatment. Cases with comorbid axis I and II disorders reported more child maltreatment than those with axis I disorders only. There was no association between types of CM and types of psychopathology. Current family adjustment and service needs (but not global functioning and motivation for psychotherapy) were correlated with a CM history. It was concluded that child maltreatment may contribute to the development of adult psychopathology, and higher levels of trauma are associated with co-morbid personality disorder, greater service needs and poorer family adjustment. A history of child maltreatment should routinely be determined when assessing adult mental health service users, especially those with personality disorders and where appropriate evidence-based psychotherapy which addresses childhood trauma should be offered.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
One-hundred-ninety-nine adult mental health service users were interviewed with a protocol that included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Structured Clinical Interviews for Axis I and II DSM-IV disorders, the Global Assessment of Functioning scale, the SCORE family assessment measure, the Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule, and the Readiness for Psychotherapy Index. Compared to a U.S. normative sample, Irish clinical cases had higher levels of maltreatment. Cases with comorbid axis I and II disorders reported more child maltreatment than those with axis I disorders only. There was no association between types of CM and types of psychopathology. Current family adjustment and service needs (but not global functioning and motivation for psychotherapy) were correlated with a CM history. It was concluded that child maltreatment may contribute to the development of adult psychopathology, and higher levels of trauma are associated with co-morbid personality disorder, greater service needs and poorer family adjustment. A history of child maltreatment should routinely be determined when assessing adult mental health service users, especially those with personality disorders and where appropriate evidence-based psychotherapy which addresses childhood trauma should be offered
Keywords:
CHILD ABUSE; CHILD WELFARE; MENTAL HEALTH; MENTAL ILLNESS
ISSN:
1873-7757

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFitzhenry, Marken
dc.contributor.authorHarte, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorCarr, Alanen
dc.contributor.authorKeenleyside, Mairien
dc.contributor.authorO'Hanrahan, Kevinen
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Megan Dalyen
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorNoonan, Hesteren
dc.contributor.authorO'Shea, Helenen
dc.contributor.authorMcCullagh, Avrilen
dc.contributor.authorMcGuinness, Shaunen
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Catherineen
dc.contributor.authorWhelan, Nealen
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, Noelen
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Stephenen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-15T16:03:27Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-15T16:03:27Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07en
dc.identifier.citationChild maltreatment and adult psychopathology in an Irish context. 2015, 45:101-7 Child Abuse Neglen
dc.identifier.issn1873-7757en
dc.identifier.pmid26026360en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.04.021en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/560488en
dc.descriptionOne-hundred-ninety-nine adult mental health service users were interviewed with a protocol that included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Structured Clinical Interviews for Axis I and II DSM-IV disorders, the Global Assessment of Functioning scale, the SCORE family assessment measure, the Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule, and the Readiness for Psychotherapy Index. Compared to a U.S. normative sample, Irish clinical cases had higher levels of maltreatment. Cases with comorbid axis I and II disorders reported more child maltreatment than those with axis I disorders only. There was no association between types of CM and types of psychopathology. Current family adjustment and service needs (but not global functioning and motivation for psychotherapy) were correlated with a CM history. It was concluded that child maltreatment may contribute to the development of adult psychopathology, and higher levels of trauma are associated with co-morbid personality disorder, greater service needs and poorer family adjustment. A history of child maltreatment should routinely be determined when assessing adult mental health service users, especially those with personality disorders and where appropriate evidence-based psychotherapy which addresses childhood trauma should be offereden
dc.description.abstractOne-hundred-ninety-nine adult mental health service users were interviewed with a protocol that included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Structured Clinical Interviews for Axis I and II DSM-IV disorders, the Global Assessment of Functioning scale, the SCORE family assessment measure, the Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule, and the Readiness for Psychotherapy Index. Compared to a U.S. normative sample, Irish clinical cases had higher levels of maltreatment. Cases with comorbid axis I and II disorders reported more child maltreatment than those with axis I disorders only. There was no association between types of CM and types of psychopathology. Current family adjustment and service needs (but not global functioning and motivation for psychotherapy) were correlated with a CM history. It was concluded that child maltreatment may contribute to the development of adult psychopathology, and higher levels of trauma are associated with co-morbid personality disorder, greater service needs and poorer family adjustment. A history of child maltreatment should routinely be determined when assessing adult mental health service users, especially those with personality disorders and where appropriate evidence-based psychotherapy which addresses childhood trauma should be offered.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherChild abuse & neglecten
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Child abuse & neglecten
dc.subjectCHILD ABUSEen
dc.subjectCHILD WELFAREen
dc.subjectMENTAL HEALTHen
dc.subjectMENTAL ILLNESSen
dc.titleChild maltreatment and adult psychopathology in an Irish context.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChild abuse & neglecten

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