Identification and characterisation of eight novel SERPINA1 Null mutations

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/560463
Title:
Identification and characterisation of eight novel SERPINA1 Null mutations
Authors:
Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Carroll, Tomás P; Ottaviani, Stefania; Fra, Anna M; O’Brien, Geraldine; Molloy, Kevin; Corda, Luciano; Medicina, Daniela; Curran, David R; McElvaney, Noel G; Luisetti, Maurizio
Citation:
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases. 2014 Nov 26;9(1):172
Issue Date:
26-Nov-2014
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13023-014-0172-y; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/560463
Abstract:
Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the most abundant circulating antiprotease and is a member of the serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) superfamily. The gene encoding AAT is the highly polymorphic SERPINA1 gene, found at 14q32.1. Mutations in the SERPINA1 gene can lead to AAT deficiency (AATD) which is associated with a substantially increased risk of lung and liver disease. The most common pathogenic AAT variant is Z (Glu342Lys) which causes AAT to misfold and polymerise within hepatocytes and other AAT-producing cells. A group of rare mutations causing AATD, termed Null or Q0, are characterised by a complete absence of AAT in the plasma. While ultra rare, these mutations confer a particularly high risk of emphysema. Methods We performed the determination of AAT serum levels by a rate immune nephelometric method or by immune turbidimetry. The phenotype was determined by isoelectric focusing analysis on agarose gel with specific immunological detection. DNA was isolated from whole peripheral blood or dried blood spot (DBS) samples using a commercial extraction kit. The new mutations were identified by sequencing all coding exons (II-V) of the SERPINA1 gene. Results We have found eight previously unidentified SERPINA1 Null mutations, named: Q0cork, Q0perugia, Q0brescia, Q0torino, Q0cosenza, Q0pordenone, Q0lampedusa, and Q0dublin . Analysis of clinical characteristics revealed evidence of the recurrence of lung symptoms (dyspnoea, cough) and lung diseases (emphysema, asthma, chronic bronchitis) in M/Null subjects, over 45 years-old, irrespective of smoking. Conclusions We have added eight more mutations to the list of SERPINA1 Null alleles. This study underlines that the laboratory diagnosis of AATD is not just a matter of degree, because the precise determination of the deficiency and Null alleles carried by an AATD individual may help to evaluate the risk for the lung disease.
Language:
en
Keywords:
LUNG DISEASE; GENETICS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFerrarotti, Ilariaen
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Tomás Pen
dc.contributor.authorOttaviani, Stefaniaen
dc.contributor.authorFra, Anna Men
dc.contributor.authorO’Brien, Geraldineen
dc.contributor.authorMolloy, Kevinen
dc.contributor.authorCorda, Lucianoen
dc.contributor.authorMedicina, Danielaen
dc.contributor.authorCurran, David Ren
dc.contributor.authorMcElvaney, Noel Gen
dc.contributor.authorLuisetti, Maurizioen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-15T09:17:21Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-15T09:17:21Zen
dc.date.issued2014-11-26en
dc.identifier.citationOrphanet Journal of Rare Diseases. 2014 Nov 26;9(1):172en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13023-014-0172-yen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/560463en
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the most abundant circulating antiprotease and is a member of the serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) superfamily. The gene encoding AAT is the highly polymorphic SERPINA1 gene, found at 14q32.1. Mutations in the SERPINA1 gene can lead to AAT deficiency (AATD) which is associated with a substantially increased risk of lung and liver disease. The most common pathogenic AAT variant is Z (Glu342Lys) which causes AAT to misfold and polymerise within hepatocytes and other AAT-producing cells. A group of rare mutations causing AATD, termed Null or Q0, are characterised by a complete absence of AAT in the plasma. While ultra rare, these mutations confer a particularly high risk of emphysema. Methods We performed the determination of AAT serum levels by a rate immune nephelometric method or by immune turbidimetry. The phenotype was determined by isoelectric focusing analysis on agarose gel with specific immunological detection. DNA was isolated from whole peripheral blood or dried blood spot (DBS) samples using a commercial extraction kit. The new mutations were identified by sequencing all coding exons (II-V) of the SERPINA1 gene. Results We have found eight previously unidentified SERPINA1 Null mutations, named: Q0cork, Q0perugia, Q0brescia, Q0torino, Q0cosenza, Q0pordenone, Q0lampedusa, and Q0dublin . Analysis of clinical characteristics revealed evidence of the recurrence of lung symptoms (dyspnoea, cough) and lung diseases (emphysema, asthma, chronic bronchitis) in M/Null subjects, over 45 years-old, irrespective of smoking. Conclusions We have added eight more mutations to the list of SERPINA1 Null alleles. This study underlines that the laboratory diagnosis of AATD is not just a matter of degree, because the precise determination of the deficiency and Null alleles carried by an AATD individual may help to evaluate the risk for the lung disease.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLUNG DISEASEen
dc.subjectGENETICSen
dc.titleIdentification and characterisation of eight novel SERPINA1 Null mutationsen
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderIlaria Ferrarotti et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2014-12-04T16:04:39Z-
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