A prospective cohort study of alcohol exposure in early and late pregnancy within an urban population in Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559517
Title:
A prospective cohort study of alcohol exposure in early and late pregnancy within an urban population in Ireland.
Authors:
Murphy, Deirdre J; Dunney, Clare; Mullally, Aoife; Adnan, Nita; Fahey, Tom; Barry, Joe
Citation:
A prospective cohort study of alcohol exposure in early and late pregnancy within an urban population in Ireland. 2014, 11 (2):2049-63 Int J Environ Res Public Health
Journal:
International journal of environmental research and public health
Issue Date:
Feb-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559517
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph110202049
PubMed ID:
24549147
Abstract:
Most studies of alcohol consumption in pregnancy have looked at one time point only, often relying on recall. The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine whether alcohol consumption changes in early and late pregnancy and whether this affects perinatal outcomes. We performed a prospective cohort study, conducted from November 2010 to December 2011 at a teaching hospital in the Republic of Ireland. Of the 907 women with a singleton pregnancy who booked for antenatal care and delivered at the hospital, 185 (20%) abstained from alcohol in the first trimester but drank in the third trimester, 105 (12%) consumed alcohol in the first and third trimesters, and the remaining 617 (68%) consumed no alcohol in pregnancy. Factors associated with continuing to drink in pregnancy included older maternal age (30-39 years), Irish nationality, private healthcare, smoking, and a history of illicit drug use. Compared to pre-pregnancy, alcohol consumption in pregnancy was markedly reduced, with the majority of drinkers consuming ≤ 5 units per week (92% in first trimester, 72-75% in third trimester). Perhaps because of this, perinatal outcomes were similar for non-drinkers, women who abstained from alcohol in the first trimester, and women who drank in the first and third trimester of pregnancy. Most women moderate their alcohol consumption in pregnancy, especially in the first trimester, and have perinatal outcomes similar to those who abstain.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Alcohol Drinking; Female; Humans; Ireland; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Pregnancy Trimester, First; Pregnancy Trimester, Third; Prospective Studies; Urban Population; Young Adult
ISSN:
1660-4601
Sponsors:
The study was funded by the Health Services Executive of Ireland as part of the “Alcohol in Pregnancy” project. The funding source had no involvement in any aspects of study design, writing of the report, or the decision to submit the paper for publication.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Deirdre Jen
dc.contributor.authorDunney, Clareen
dc.contributor.authorMullally, Aoifeen
dc.contributor.authorAdnan, Nitaen
dc.contributor.authorFahey, Tomen
dc.contributor.authorBarry, Joeen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-10T11:22:51Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-10T11:22:51Zen
dc.date.issued2014-02en
dc.identifier.citationA prospective cohort study of alcohol exposure in early and late pregnancy within an urban population in Ireland. 2014, 11 (2):2049-63 Int J Environ Res Public Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601en
dc.identifier.pmid24549147en
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph110202049en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559517en
dc.description.abstractMost studies of alcohol consumption in pregnancy have looked at one time point only, often relying on recall. The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine whether alcohol consumption changes in early and late pregnancy and whether this affects perinatal outcomes. We performed a prospective cohort study, conducted from November 2010 to December 2011 at a teaching hospital in the Republic of Ireland. Of the 907 women with a singleton pregnancy who booked for antenatal care and delivered at the hospital, 185 (20%) abstained from alcohol in the first trimester but drank in the third trimester, 105 (12%) consumed alcohol in the first and third trimesters, and the remaining 617 (68%) consumed no alcohol in pregnancy. Factors associated with continuing to drink in pregnancy included older maternal age (30-39 years), Irish nationality, private healthcare, smoking, and a history of illicit drug use. Compared to pre-pregnancy, alcohol consumption in pregnancy was markedly reduced, with the majority of drinkers consuming ≤ 5 units per week (92% in first trimester, 72-75% in third trimester). Perhaps because of this, perinatal outcomes were similar for non-drinkers, women who abstained from alcohol in the first trimester, and women who drank in the first and third trimester of pregnancy. Most women moderate their alcohol consumption in pregnancy, especially in the first trimester, and have perinatal outcomes similar to those who abstain.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe study was funded by the Health Services Executive of Ireland as part of the “Alcohol in Pregnancy” project. The funding source had no involvement in any aspects of study design, writing of the report, or the decision to submit the paper for publication.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of environmental research and public healthen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinkingen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIrelanden
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcomeen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Trimester, Firsten
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Trimester, Thirden
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshUrban Populationen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleA prospective cohort study of alcohol exposure in early and late pregnancy within an urban population in Ireland.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of environmental research and public healthen
dc.description.fundingOtheren
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.