The Care of the Aged: Report of an Inter-Departmental Committee on the Care of the Aged, 1968.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559466
Title:
The Care of the Aged: Report of an Inter-Departmental Committee on the Care of the Aged, 1968.
Authors:
Government of Ireland
Citation:
Government of Ireland. 1968. The Care of the Aged: Report of an Inter-Departmental Committee on the Care of the Aged, 1968. Dublin: Government Publications.
Publisher:
Government Publications
Issue Date:
1968
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559466
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
At the beginning of this century the average expectation of life at birth was about 50 years. Now it is about 70 years. In the intervening period the proportion of the population aged 65 years and over has increased from 1 in 15 to 1 in 9. The increase in the number of the aged is most marked among the very old, e.g. in the 15 years from the census of 1951 to that of 1966 the number of those aged 85 years and over increased by 53%-from 13,285 to 20,297-an average increase of over 450 persons per year. Old age is not necessarily a time of ill-health and disability and most of the aged manage to lead independent, or largely independent, lives. There are now, however, more than 300,000 persons aged 65 years and over and the total number is so great that the provision of services for the proportion in need of help still presents the community with an enormous and a growing problem to which there is no ready or simple solution. It is sometimes said that the young people of to-day do not want to look after their aged relatives. Undoubtedly this is true in some cases, but the fact remains that the vast majority of the aged live in the community and that many families make great sacrifices to look after their aged relatives. Even with such sacrifices it is beyond the power of the family, in most cases, to provide for all the needs of the aged-these needs can be met only by a partnership between the family and public and voluntary organisations. The needs vary to a great extent, they can be related to any facet of living, and it requires a multiplicity ,of measures to meet them. The different measures tend to be complementary and failure to provide one may result in increased pressure on another, e.g. failure to provide financial aid or special housing may result in increased demand for more costly institutional care. Ultimately it may cost less, therefore, to provide some services than to try to do without them. The need for various forms of help may not be so great for the aged who are in the middle and higher income groups as it is for those in the lower income group, but a degree of need still exists. The Committee considers, therefore, that services in the future should cater, to some extent at least, for all classes.
Keywords:
OLDER PEOPLE; PEOPLE WITH A DISABILITY; LIFE EXPECTANCY; STATISTICAL DATA; HEALTH SERVICES

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGovernment of Irelanden
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-10T09:50:06Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-10T09:50:06Zen
dc.date.issued1968en
dc.identifier.citationGovernment of Ireland. 1968. The Care of the Aged: Report of an Inter-Departmental Committee on the Care of the Aged, 1968. Dublin: Government Publications.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559466en
dc.descriptionAt the beginning of this century the average expectation of life at birth was about 50 years. Now it is about 70 years. In the intervening period the proportion of the population aged 65 years and over has increased from 1 in 15 to 1 in 9. The increase in the number of the aged is most marked among the very old, e.g. in the 15 years from the census of 1951 to that of 1966 the number of those aged 85 years and over increased by 53%-from 13,285 to 20,297-an average increase of over 450 persons per year. Old age is not necessarily a time of ill-health and disability and most of the aged manage to lead independent, or largely independent, lives. There are now, however, more than 300,000 persons aged 65 years and over and the total number is so great that the provision of services for the proportion in need of help still presents the community with an enormous and a growing problem to which there is no ready or simple solution. It is sometimes said that the young people of to-day do not want to look after their aged relatives. Undoubtedly this is true in some cases, but the fact remains that the vast majority of the aged live in the community and that many families make great sacrifices to look after their aged relatives. Even with such sacrifices it is beyond the power of the family, in most cases, to provide for all the needs of the aged-these needs can be met only by a partnership between the family and public and voluntary organisations. The needs vary to a great extent, they can be related to any facet of living, and it requires a multiplicity ,of measures to meet them. The different measures tend to be complementary and failure to provide one may result in increased pressure on another, e.g. failure to provide financial aid or special housing may result in increased demand for more costly institutional care. Ultimately it may cost less, therefore, to provide some services than to try to do without them. The need for various forms of help may not be so great for the aged who are in the middle and higher income groups as it is for those in the lower income group, but a degree of need still exists. The Committee considers, therefore, that services in the future should cater, to some extent at least, for all classes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGovernment Publicationsen
dc.subjectOLDER PEOPLEen
dc.subjectPEOPLE WITH A DISABILITYen
dc.subjectLIFE EXPECTANCYen
dc.subjectSTATISTICAL DATAen
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICESen
dc.titleThe Care of the Aged: Report of an Inter-Departmental Committee on the Care of the Aged, 1968.en
dc.typeReporten
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