An investigation of comorbid psychological disorders, sleep problems, gastrointestinal symptoms and epilepsy in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559459
Title:
An investigation of comorbid psychological disorders, sleep problems, gastrointestinal symptoms and epilepsy in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.
Authors:
Mannion, Arlene; Leader, Geraldine; Healy, Olive
Publisher:
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Journal:
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Issue Date:
Jan-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559459
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The current study investigated comorbidity in eighty-nine children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Ireland. Comorbidity is the presence of one or more disorders in addition to a primary disorder. The prevalence of comorbid psychological disorders, behaviors associated with comorbid psychopathology, epilepsy, gastrointestinal symptoms and sleep problems were examined. Age, gender, level of intellectual disability, presence of epilepsy, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) and an anxiety disorder were determined using a self-constructed demographic questionnaire. The Autism Spectrum Disorder- Comorbidity-Child (ASD-CC) was administered to informants to assess symptoms of psychopathology and emotional difficulties. The Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and Gastrointestinal symptom inventory were administered to assess sleep problems and gastrointestinal symptoms respectively. Forty-six percent of participants had a comorbid disorder, with this number increasing to 78.7% if intellectual disability was included. The prevalence of epilepsy was 10.1%, AD/HD was 18% and an anxiety disorder was 15.7%. Prevalence rates of gastrointestinal symptoms and sleep problems are discussed in the study
Keywords:
AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER; CHILDREN; SLEEP DISORDERS; GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS; EPILEPSY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMannion, Arleneen
dc.contributor.authorLeader, Geraldineen
dc.contributor.authorHealy, Oliveen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-10T09:38:03Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-10T09:38:03Zen
dc.date.issued2013-01en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559459en
dc.descriptionThe current study investigated comorbidity in eighty-nine children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Ireland. Comorbidity is the presence of one or more disorders in addition to a primary disorder. The prevalence of comorbid psychological disorders, behaviors associated with comorbid psychopathology, epilepsy, gastrointestinal symptoms and sleep problems were examined. Age, gender, level of intellectual disability, presence of epilepsy, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) and an anxiety disorder were determined using a self-constructed demographic questionnaire. The Autism Spectrum Disorder- Comorbidity-Child (ASD-CC) was administered to informants to assess symptoms of psychopathology and emotional difficulties. The Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and Gastrointestinal symptom inventory were administered to assess sleep problems and gastrointestinal symptoms respectively. Forty-six percent of participants had a comorbid disorder, with this number increasing to 78.7% if intellectual disability was included. The prevalence of epilepsy was 10.1%, AD/HD was 18% and an anxiety disorder was 15.7%. Prevalence rates of gastrointestinal symptoms and sleep problems are discussed in the studyen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherResearch in Autism Spectrum Disordersen
dc.subjectAUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERen
dc.subjectCHILDRENen
dc.subjectSLEEP DISORDERSen
dc.subjectGASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERSen
dc.subjectEPILEPSYen
dc.titleAn investigation of comorbid psychological disorders, sleep problems, gastrointestinal symptoms and epilepsy in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalResearch in Autism Spectrum Disordersen
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