Food borne Salmonellosis: report to the Minister for Health and the Minister for Agriculture and Food.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559388
Title:
Food borne Salmonellosis: report to the Minister for Health and the Minister for Agriculture and Food.
Authors:
Food Safety Advisory Committee; Department of Health; Department of Agriculture and Food
Citation:
Food Safety Advisory Committee, Department of Health, Department of Agriculture and Food. 1991. Food borne Salmonellosis: report to the Minister for Health and the Minister for Agriculture and Food. Dublin: Food Safety Advisory Committee.
Publisher:
Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)
Issue Date:
Oct-1991
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559388
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Many people have experienced an attack of food-poisoning which usually consists of a short episode of diarrhoea which may be associated with vomiting. A wide range of micro-organisms such as viruses, bacteria or protozoa may be responsible for such attacks. Salmonellae are an important bacterial cause of food-poisoning. As with almost any kind of infection, contact with disease causing microbes does not inevitably result in a disease. People routinely cope with a low level of bacterial contamination in much of the food consumed. Natural defences such as acid in the stomach and other protective,mechanisms in the gut are enough to kill bacteria eaten in food. However, if we ingest large doses of pathogenic microbes, we are likely to fall ill. This is why food should be stored at 3°C or below to prevent the multiplication of microbes in the food.
Keywords:
FOOD SAFETY; MICROBIOLOGY; INFECTION CONTROL; SALMONELLA
Series/Report no.:
FSAC Report; 10

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFood Safety Advisory Committeeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Healthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Agriculture and Fooden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-09T16:02:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-09T16:02:26Zen
dc.date.issued1991-10-
dc.identifier.citationFood Safety Advisory Committee, Department of Health, Department of Agriculture and Food. 1991. Food borne Salmonellosis: report to the Minister for Health and the Minister for Agriculture and Food. Dublin: Food Safety Advisory Committee.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559388en
dc.descriptionMany people have experienced an attack of food-poisoning which usually consists of a short episode of diarrhoea which may be associated with vomiting. A wide range of micro-organisms such as viruses, bacteria or protozoa may be responsible for such attacks. Salmonellae are an important bacterial cause of food-poisoning. As with almost any kind of infection, contact with disease causing microbes does not inevitably result in a disease. People routinely cope with a low level of bacterial contamination in much of the food consumed. Natural defences such as acid in the stomach and other protective,mechanisms in the gut are enough to kill bacteria eaten in food. However, if we ingest large doses of pathogenic microbes, we are likely to fall ill. This is why food should be stored at 3°C or below to prevent the multiplication of microbes in the food.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFood Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)en_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFSAC Reporten_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseries10en_GB
dc.subjectFOOD SAFETYen_GB
dc.subjectMICROBIOLOGYen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.subjectSALMONELLAen_GB
dc.titleFood borne Salmonellosis: report to the Minister for Health and the Minister for Agriculture and Food.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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