Parents’ experiences of neonatal nurses providing family-centred care in the neonatal intensive care unit

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559292
Title:
Parents’ experiences of neonatal nurses providing family-centred care in the neonatal intensive care unit
Authors:
Greene, Liz
Affiliation:
Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin
Issue Date:
5-Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559292
Item Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
Abstract This qualitative study was conducted with the aim of discovering parents’ experiences of receiving family-centred care from the neonatal nurses of an Irish, Level III, neonatal intensive care unit. The objective of the study was to use the knowledge gained from the parents’ experiences to improve partnership between neonatal nurses and parents. A total of five couples were recruited using purposeful sampling. One taped, semi-structured interview was conducted with each of the couples that participated. An interpretive, hermeneutic approach was utilized to discover the submerged essences/truths of the parents’ experiences of receiving family-centred care. The four main types of family-centred care that the parents’ received from the neonatal nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit were: Comforting, Hit or Miss, Empowering, and Waiting for Family-Centred Care. It was identified from the interpretation of the transcribed data that all the parents had highly valued family-centred nursing care activities that were comforting and empowering. These activities from neonatal nurses included: facilitating kangaroo care, providing emotional comfort to parents, loving care of premature babies and teaching parents how to perform basic cares for their own baby. The primary barrier to comforting and empowering family-centred care was the busyness of neonatal nurses due to the high activity level of the neonatal intensive care unit. While recognizing the reality of austerity on government Health spending, these findings indicate that in order to provide individualised family-centred care for parents of a premature baby in the NICU, an increased ratio of nurses to babies is essential.
Keywords:
RESEARCH; NEONATAL NURSING; INTENSIVE CARE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGreene, Lizen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-08T15:46:10Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-08T15:46:10Zen
dc.date.issued2014-06-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559292en
dc.descriptionAbstract This qualitative study was conducted with the aim of discovering parents’ experiences of receiving family-centred care from the neonatal nurses of an Irish, Level III, neonatal intensive care unit. The objective of the study was to use the knowledge gained from the parents’ experiences to improve partnership between neonatal nurses and parents. A total of five couples were recruited using purposeful sampling. One taped, semi-structured interview was conducted with each of the couples that participated. An interpretive, hermeneutic approach was utilized to discover the submerged essences/truths of the parents’ experiences of receiving family-centred care. The four main types of family-centred care that the parents’ received from the neonatal nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit were: Comforting, Hit or Miss, Empowering, and Waiting for Family-Centred Care. It was identified from the interpretation of the transcribed data that all the parents had highly valued family-centred nursing care activities that were comforting and empowering. These activities from neonatal nurses included: facilitating kangaroo care, providing emotional comfort to parents, loving care of premature babies and teaching parents how to perform basic cares for their own baby. The primary barrier to comforting and empowering family-centred care was the busyness of neonatal nurses due to the high activity level of the neonatal intensive care unit. While recognizing the reality of austerity on government Health spending, these findings indicate that in order to provide individualised family-centred care for parents of a premature baby in the NICU, an increased ratio of nurses to babies is essential.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectRESEARCHen
dc.subjectNEONATAL NURSINGen
dc.subjectINTENSIVE CAREen
dc.titleParents’ experiences of neonatal nurses providing family-centred care in the neonatal intensive care uniten
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Nursing & Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublinen
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