The role of matricellular proteins in glaucoma.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559244
Title:
The role of matricellular proteins in glaucoma.
Authors:
Wallace, Deborah M; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E; Downs, J Crawford; O'Brien, Colm J
Citation:
The role of matricellular proteins in glaucoma. 2014, 37:174-82 Matrix Biol.
Journal:
Matrix biology : journal of the International Society for Matrix Biology
Issue Date:
Jul-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559244
DOI:
10.1016/j.matbio.2014.03.007
PubMed ID:
24727033
Abstract:
Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy affecting approximately 60million people worldwide and is the second most common cause of irreversible blindness. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the main risk factor for developing glaucoma and is caused by impaired aqueous humor drainage through the trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm's canal (SC). In primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), this elevation in IOP in turn leads to deformation at the optic nerve head (ONH) specifically at the lamina cribrosa (LC) region where there is also a deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules such as collagen and fibronectin. Matricellular proteins are non-structural secreted glycoproteins that help cells communicate with their surrounding ECM. This family of proteins includes connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), also known as CCN2, thrombospondins (TSPs), secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), periostin, osteonectin, and Tenascin-C and -X and other ECM proteins. All members appear to play a role in fibrosis and increased ECM deposition. Most are widely expressed in tissues particularly in the TM and ONH and deficiency of TSP1 and SPARC have been shown to lower IOP in mouse models of glaucoma through enhanced outflow facility. The role of these proteins in glaucoma is emerging as some have an association with the pathophysiology of the TM and LC regions and might therefore be potential targets for therapeutic intervention in glaucoma.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Local subject classification:
GLAUCOMA
MeSH:
Animals; Aqueous Humor; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Connective Tissue Growth Factor; Drug Delivery Systems; Extracellular Matrix Proteins; Glaucoma; Humans; Intraocular Pressure; Mice; Models, Biological; Osteonectin; Thrombospondins; Trabecular Meshwork
ISSN:
1569-1802
Sponsors:
This work was funded by the Health Research Board Ireland (HRA_POR2010-129) and an award from the International Glaucoma Association/United Kingdom and Eire Glaucoma Society.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Deborah Men
dc.contributor.authorMurphy-Ullrich, Joanne Een
dc.contributor.authorDowns, J Crawforden
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Colm Jen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-08T14:01:14Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-08T14:01:14Zen
dc.date.issued2014-07en
dc.identifier.citationThe role of matricellular proteins in glaucoma. 2014, 37:174-82 Matrix Biol.en
dc.identifier.issn1569-1802en
dc.identifier.pmid24727033en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.matbio.2014.03.007en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559244en
dc.description.abstractGlaucoma is an optic neuropathy affecting approximately 60million people worldwide and is the second most common cause of irreversible blindness. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the main risk factor for developing glaucoma and is caused by impaired aqueous humor drainage through the trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm's canal (SC). In primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), this elevation in IOP in turn leads to deformation at the optic nerve head (ONH) specifically at the lamina cribrosa (LC) region where there is also a deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules such as collagen and fibronectin. Matricellular proteins are non-structural secreted glycoproteins that help cells communicate with their surrounding ECM. This family of proteins includes connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), also known as CCN2, thrombospondins (TSPs), secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), periostin, osteonectin, and Tenascin-C and -X and other ECM proteins. All members appear to play a role in fibrosis and increased ECM deposition. Most are widely expressed in tissues particularly in the TM and ONH and deficiency of TSP1 and SPARC have been shown to lower IOP in mouse models of glaucoma through enhanced outflow facility. The role of these proteins in glaucoma is emerging as some have an association with the pathophysiology of the TM and LC regions and might therefore be potential targets for therapeutic intervention in glaucoma.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by the Health Research Board Ireland (HRA_POR2010-129) and an award from the International Glaucoma Association/United Kingdom and Eire Glaucoma Society.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Matrix biology : journal of the International Society for Matrix Biologyen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAqueous Humoren
dc.subject.meshCell Adhesion Moleculesen
dc.subject.meshConnective Tissue Growth Factoren
dc.subject.meshDrug Delivery Systemsen
dc.subject.meshExtracellular Matrix Proteinsen
dc.subject.meshGlaucomaen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIntraocular Pressureen
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen
dc.subject.meshOsteonectinen
dc.subject.meshThrombospondinsen
dc.subject.meshTrabecular Meshworken
dc.subject.otherGLAUCOMAen
dc.titleThe role of matricellular proteins in glaucoma.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMatrix biology : journal of the International Society for Matrix Biologyen
dc.description.fundingHRB Health Research Boarden
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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