Hazardous alcohol consumption among university students in Ireland: a cross-sectional study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559233
Title:
Hazardous alcohol consumption among university students in Ireland: a cross-sectional study.
Authors:
Davoren, Martin P; Shiely, Frances; Byrne, Michael; Perry, Ivan J
Citation:
Hazardous alcohol consumption among university students in Ireland: a cross-sectional study. 2015, 5 (1):e006045 BMJ Open
Journal:
BMJ open
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559233
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006045
PubMed ID:
25633284
Additional Links:
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/5/1/e006045.abstract?sid=466234bd-ea69-4ad9-b92c-61bd4df7f9b9
Abstract:
There is considerable evidence of a cultural shift towards heavier alcohol consumption among university students, especially women. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and correlates of hazardous alcohol consumption (HAC) among university students with particular reference to gender and to compare different modes of data collection in this population.; A large Irish university.; A cross-sectional study using a classroom distributed paper questionnaire.; A total of 2275 undergraduates completed the classroom survey, 84% of those in class and 51% of those registered for the relevant module.; Prevalence of HAC measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for Consumption (AUDIT-C) and the proportion of university students reporting 1 or more of 13 adverse consequences linked to HAC. HAC was defined as an AUDIT-C score of 6 or more among males and 5 or more among females.; In the classroom sample, 66.4% (95% CI 64.4 to 68.3) reported HAC (65.2% men and 67.3% women). In women, 57.4% met HAC thresholds for men. Similar patterns of adverse consequences were observed among men and women. Students with a hazardous consumption pattern were more likely to report smoking, illicit drug use and being sexually active.; The findings highlight the high prevalence of HAC among university students relative to the general population. Public policy measures require review to tackle the short-term and long-term risks to physical, mental and social health and well-being.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
There is considerable evidence of a cultural shift towards heavier alcohol consumption among university students, especially women. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and correlates of hazardous alcohol consumption (HAC) among university students with particular reference to gender and to compare different modes of data collection in this population.
Keywords:
ALCOHOL MISUSE; STUDENTS
ISSN:
2044-6055

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDavoren, Martin Pen
dc.contributor.authorShiely, Francesen
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorPerry, Ivan Jen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-08T11:57:35Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-08T11:57:35Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationHazardous alcohol consumption among university students in Ireland: a cross-sectional study. 2015, 5 (1):e006045 BMJ Openen
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055en
dc.identifier.pmid25633284en
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006045en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559233en
dc.descriptionThere is considerable evidence of a cultural shift towards heavier alcohol consumption among university students, especially women. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and correlates of hazardous alcohol consumption (HAC) among university students with particular reference to gender and to compare different modes of data collection in this population.en
dc.description.abstractThere is considerable evidence of a cultural shift towards heavier alcohol consumption among university students, especially women. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and correlates of hazardous alcohol consumption (HAC) among university students with particular reference to gender and to compare different modes of data collection in this population.en
dc.description.abstractA large Irish university.en
dc.description.abstractA cross-sectional study using a classroom distributed paper questionnaire.en
dc.description.abstractA total of 2275 undergraduates completed the classroom survey, 84% of those in class and 51% of those registered for the relevant module.en
dc.description.abstractPrevalence of HAC measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for Consumption (AUDIT-C) and the proportion of university students reporting 1 or more of 13 adverse consequences linked to HAC. HAC was defined as an AUDIT-C score of 6 or more among males and 5 or more among females.en
dc.description.abstractIn the classroom sample, 66.4% (95% CI 64.4 to 68.3) reported HAC (65.2% men and 67.3% women). In women, 57.4% met HAC thresholds for men. Similar patterns of adverse consequences were observed among men and women. Students with a hazardous consumption pattern were more likely to report smoking, illicit drug use and being sexually active.en
dc.description.abstractThe findings highlight the high prevalence of HAC among university students relative to the general population. Public policy measures require review to tackle the short-term and long-term risks to physical, mental and social health and well-being.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/5/1/e006045.abstract?sid=466234bd-ea69-4ad9-b92c-61bd4df7f9b9en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMJ openen
dc.subjectALCOHOL MISUSEen
dc.subjectSTUDENTSen
dc.titleHazardous alcohol consumption among university students in Ireland: a cross-sectional study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ openen

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