An examination of healthcare professional’s barriers and facilitators to adopting E-Learning in palliative care education.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559225
Title:
An examination of healthcare professional’s barriers and facilitators to adopting E-Learning in palliative care education.
Authors:
Callinan, J; McGarr, O
Affiliation:
Milford Care Centre; University of Limerick
Journal:
15th IAPC Annual Education and Research Seminar
Issue Date:
5-Feb-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559225
Item Type:
Conference Poster
Language:
en
Description:
15th Annual Irish Association of Palliative Care Annual Education & Research Seminar, Dublin. Background Whilst e-learning offers considerable opportunities for more flexible learning to those who cannot access such education in the traditional face-to-face classroom, educators need to understand the challenges and facilitators for learners using e-learning in palliative and end-of-life care. Aim: To examine barriers and facilitators to adopting e-learning in palliative care in Ireland by nurses, doctors, allied health care professionals and healthcare assistants. Objectives: 1) To understand the barriers that exist for those accessing e-learning courses in palliative care 2) To examine how we can facilitate the adoption of e-learning Design & methodology Cross-sectional surveys were developed, piloted and disseminated to clinical staff in Irish hospice services. Results Only 37% of clinical staff in palliative care had experience of completing a course previously using E-Learning alone. Sixty-two per cent believed there are limitations with E-Learning about palliative care. Nearly one third indicated that remaining motivated would be a challenge in E-Learning. Only thirty-four per cent reported that lacking computer skills would be a barrier to using E-Learning. An analysis of qualitative data indicated that having designated time to carry out E-Learning would be an important facilitator, as well as quick technical and administrative support you could call on and access to computers with a designated quiet space . Eighty per cent of respondents reported that if a course or study module they were interested in became available which had an E-Learning component, they would avail of it. Fifty per cent indicated they would like to receive support face-to-face or hands on training followed by forty-seven per cent reporting online assistance. Conclusion – By understanding healthcare professional’s attitudes, knowledge and experiences of utilizing e-learning, it will provide insight into the barriers that exist in adopting e-learning in palliative care in Ireland and assist us in addressing them.
Keywords:
E-LEARNING; PALLIATIVE CARE; EDUCATION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCallinan, Jen
dc.contributor.authorMcGarr, Oen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-08T10:31:34Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-08T10:31:34Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559225en
dc.description15th Annual Irish Association of Palliative Care Annual Education & Research Seminar, Dublin. Background Whilst e-learning offers considerable opportunities for more flexible learning to those who cannot access such education in the traditional face-to-face classroom, educators need to understand the challenges and facilitators for learners using e-learning in palliative and end-of-life care. Aim: To examine barriers and facilitators to adopting e-learning in palliative care in Ireland by nurses, doctors, allied health care professionals and healthcare assistants. Objectives: 1) To understand the barriers that exist for those accessing e-learning courses in palliative care 2) To examine how we can facilitate the adoption of e-learning Design & methodology Cross-sectional surveys were developed, piloted and disseminated to clinical staff in Irish hospice services. Results Only 37% of clinical staff in palliative care had experience of completing a course previously using E-Learning alone. Sixty-two per cent believed there are limitations with E-Learning about palliative care. Nearly one third indicated that remaining motivated would be a challenge in E-Learning. Only thirty-four per cent reported that lacking computer skills would be a barrier to using E-Learning. An analysis of qualitative data indicated that having designated time to carry out E-Learning would be an important facilitator, as well as quick technical and administrative support you could call on and access to computers with a designated quiet space . Eighty per cent of respondents reported that if a course or study module they were interested in became available which had an E-Learning component, they would avail of it. Fifty per cent indicated they would like to receive support face-to-face or hands on training followed by forty-seven per cent reporting online assistance. Conclusion – By understanding healthcare professional’s attitudes, knowledge and experiences of utilizing e-learning, it will provide insight into the barriers that exist in adopting e-learning in palliative care in Ireland and assist us in addressing them.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectE-LEARNINGen
dc.subjectPALLIATIVE CAREen
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen
dc.titleAn examination of healthcare professional’s barriers and facilitators to adopting E-Learning in palliative care education.en
dc.typeConference Posteren
dc.contributor.departmentMilford Care Centre; University of Limericken
dc.identifier.journal15th IAPC Annual Education and Research Seminaren
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