A pilot cross-sectional study of patients presenting with cellulitis to emergency departments.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559063
Title:
A pilot cross-sectional study of patients presenting with cellulitis to emergency departments.
Authors:
Quirke, M; Saunders, J; O'Sullivan, R; Milenkovski, H; Wakai, A
Citation:
A pilot cross-sectional study of patients presenting with cellulitis to emergency departments., 107 (10):316-8 Ir Med J
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Nov-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559063
PubMed ID:
25556256
Abstract:
To characterise the Emergency Department (ED) prevalence of cellulitis, factors predicting oral antibiotic therapy and the utility of the Clinical Resource Efficiency Support Team (CREST) guideline in predicting patient management in the ED setting, a prospective, cross-sectional study of consecutive adult patients presenting to 3 Irish EDs was performed. The overall prevalence of cellulitis was 12 per 1,000 ED visits. Of 59 patients enrolled, 45.8% were discharged. Predictors of treatment with oral antibiotics were: CREST, Class 1 allocation (odds ratio (OR) 6.81, 95% Cl =1.5-30.1, p=0.012), patient self-referral (OR= 6.2, 95% Cl 1.9- 20.0, p=0.03) and symptom duration longer than 48 hours (OR 1.2, 95% Cl = 1.0-1.5,p=0.049). In conflict with guideline recommendation, 43% of patients in CREST Class 1 received IV therapy. Treatment with oral antibiotics was predicted by CREST Class 1 allocation, self-referral, symptom duration of more than 48 hours and absence of pre-EO antibiotic therapy.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
To characterise the Emergency Department (ED) prevalence of cellulitis, factors predicting oral antibiotic therapy and the utility of the Clinical Resource Efficiency Support Team (CREST) guideline in predicting patient management in the ED setting, a prospective, cross-sectional study of consecutive adult patients presenting to 3 Irish EDs was performed. The overall prevalence of cellulitis was 12 per 1,000 ED visits. Of 59 patients enrolled, 45.8% were discharged. Predictors of treatment with oral antibiotics were: CREST Class 1 allocation (odds ratio (OR) 6.81, 95% CI =1.5-30.1, p=0.012), patient self-referral (OR= 6.2, 95% CI 1.9 â 20.0, p=0.03) and symptom duration longer than 48 hours (OR 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0-1.5,p=0.049). In conflict with guideline recommendation, 43% of patients in CREST Class 1 received IV therapy. Treatment with oral antibiotics was predicted by CREST Class 1 allocation, self-referral, symptom duration of more than 48 hours and absence of pre-ED antibiotic therapy
Keywords:
EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE; CELLULITIS; ANTIBIOTICS
MeSH:
Anti-Bacterial Agents; Cellulitis; Cross-Sectional Studies; Emergency Service, Hospital; Female; Humans; Ireland; Male; Middle Aged; Pilot Projects
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQuirke, Men
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Jen
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Ren
dc.contributor.authorMilenkovski, Hen
dc.contributor.authorWakai, Aen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-06T15:23:50Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-06T15:23:50Zen
dc.date.issued2014-11en
dc.identifier.citationA pilot cross-sectional study of patients presenting with cellulitis to emergency departments., 107 (10):316-8 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102en
dc.identifier.pmid25556256en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559063en
dc.descriptionTo characterise the Emergency Department (ED) prevalence of cellulitis, factors predicting oral antibiotic therapy and the utility of the Clinical Resource Efficiency Support Team (CREST) guideline in predicting patient management in the ED setting, a prospective, cross-sectional study of consecutive adult patients presenting to 3 Irish EDs was performed. The overall prevalence of cellulitis was 12 per 1,000 ED visits. Of 59 patients enrolled, 45.8% were discharged. Predictors of treatment with oral antibiotics were: CREST Class 1 allocation (odds ratio (OR) 6.81, 95% CI =1.5-30.1, p=0.012), patient self-referral (OR= 6.2, 95% CI 1.9 â 20.0, p=0.03) and symptom duration longer than 48 hours (OR 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0-1.5,p=0.049). In conflict with guideline recommendation, 43% of patients in CREST Class 1 received IV therapy. Treatment with oral antibiotics was predicted by CREST Class 1 allocation, self-referral, symptom duration of more than 48 hours and absence of pre-ED antibiotic therapyen
dc.description.abstractTo characterise the Emergency Department (ED) prevalence of cellulitis, factors predicting oral antibiotic therapy and the utility of the Clinical Resource Efficiency Support Team (CREST) guideline in predicting patient management in the ED setting, a prospective, cross-sectional study of consecutive adult patients presenting to 3 Irish EDs was performed. The overall prevalence of cellulitis was 12 per 1,000 ED visits. Of 59 patients enrolled, 45.8% were discharged. Predictors of treatment with oral antibiotics were: CREST, Class 1 allocation (odds ratio (OR) 6.81, 95% Cl =1.5-30.1, p=0.012), patient self-referral (OR= 6.2, 95% Cl 1.9- 20.0, p=0.03) and symptom duration longer than 48 hours (OR 1.2, 95% Cl = 1.0-1.5,p=0.049). In conflict with guideline recommendation, 43% of patients in CREST Class 1 received IV therapy. Treatment with oral antibiotics was predicted by CREST Class 1 allocation, self-referral, symptom duration of more than 48 hours and absence of pre-EO antibiotic therapy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen
dc.subjectEMERGENCY MEDICAL CAREen
dc.subjectCELLULITISen
dc.subjectANTIBIOTICSen
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agentsen
dc.subject.meshCellulitisen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshEmergency Service, Hospitalen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIrelanden
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPilot Projectsen
dc.titleA pilot cross-sectional study of patients presenting with cellulitis to emergency departments.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen

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