Pedestrian deaths in children--potential for prevention.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559052
Title:
Pedestrian deaths in children--potential for prevention.
Authors:
Hamilton, K; Macken, W; McGarvey, C; Matthews, T G; Nicholson, A J
Citation:
Pedestrian deaths in children--potential for prevention. 2015, 108 (1):8-11 Ir Med J
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Jan-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559052
PubMed ID:
25702345
Abstract:
The National Paediatric Mortality Database was reviewed for the six year period 1st January 2006 to 31st December 2011 and all pedestrian deaths extracted, after review of available data the deaths were categorized as either traffic or non-traffic related. There were 45 child pedestrian fatalities in the period examined. Traffic related deaths accounted for 26 (58%) vs. 19 (42%) non-traffic related. Analysis of the deaths showed there was a male preponderance 28 (62%), weekend trend 22 (49%) with an evening 16 (35%) and summer peak 20 (44%). The highest proportion of deaths occurred in the 1-4 year age group 24 (53%), with 13 (28%) due to low speed vehicle rollovers, mainly occurring in residential driveways 8 (61%). Child pedestrian fatalities are highly preventable through the modification of risk factors including behavioural, social and environmental. Preventative action needs to be addressed, particularly in relation to non-traffic related deaths i.e, low speed vehicle rollovers.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
CHILD MORTALITY; ACCIDENT; TRAFFIC ACCIDENT
MeSH:
Accident Prevention; Accidents; Accidents, Traffic; Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Humans; Infant; Male; Seasons; Socioeconomic Factors; Walking
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Ken
dc.contributor.authorMacken, Wen
dc.contributor.authorMcGarvey, Cen
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, T Gen
dc.contributor.authorNicholson, A Jen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-06T15:17:45Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-06T15:17:45Zen
dc.date.issued2015-01en
dc.identifier.citationPedestrian deaths in children--potential for prevention. 2015, 108 (1):8-11 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102en
dc.identifier.pmid25702345en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559052en
dc.description.abstractThe National Paediatric Mortality Database was reviewed for the six year period 1st January 2006 to 31st December 2011 and all pedestrian deaths extracted, after review of available data the deaths were categorized as either traffic or non-traffic related. There were 45 child pedestrian fatalities in the period examined. Traffic related deaths accounted for 26 (58%) vs. 19 (42%) non-traffic related. Analysis of the deaths showed there was a male preponderance 28 (62%), weekend trend 22 (49%) with an evening 16 (35%) and summer peak 20 (44%). The highest proportion of deaths occurred in the 1-4 year age group 24 (53%), with 13 (28%) due to low speed vehicle rollovers, mainly occurring in residential driveways 8 (61%). Child pedestrian fatalities are highly preventable through the modification of risk factors including behavioural, social and environmental. Preventative action needs to be addressed, particularly in relation to non-traffic related deaths i.e, low speed vehicle rollovers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen
dc.subjectCHILD MORTALITYen
dc.subjectACCIDENTen
dc.subjectTRAFFIC ACCIDENTen
dc.subject.meshAccident Preventionen
dc.subject.meshAccidentsen
dc.subject.meshAccidents, Trafficen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen
dc.subject.meshWalkingen
dc.titlePedestrian deaths in children--potential for prevention.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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