Bird fancier's lung in mushroom workers

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559028
Title:
Bird fancier's lung in mushroom workers
Authors:
J Hayes,; M Barrett
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Apr-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559028
Abstract:
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis has been described in mushrooms workers caused by exposure to mushroom or fungal spores in the compost used to grow mushrooms. We describe two mushroom workers who developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to exposure to avian proteins found in poultry manure which was used in producing mushroom compost. Both workers were employed in the compost production area. Both presented with typical features of HP. Both workers had negative serological and precipitin studies to Apergillus fumigatus, Saccarhopolyspora rectivirgula and thermophilic actinomycetes but had positive responses to poultry antibodies. Neither was exposed to mushroom spores. Both workers required initial therapy with corticosteroids. Relocation with avoidance of further exposure resulted in complete cure in one worker and change in work practice with the use of personal protections equipment resulted in the second worker clinical stabilisation. These are the first reported cases of bird fanciers lung in mushroom workers.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
RESPIRATORY INFECTION; ASPERGILLUS
Local subject classification:
AGRICULTURAL EMPLOYEES

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJ Hayes,en
dc.contributor.authorM Barretten
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-06T12:02:53Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-06T12:02:53Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559028en
dc.description.abstractHypersensitivity pneumonitis has been described in mushrooms workers caused by exposure to mushroom or fungal spores in the compost used to grow mushrooms. We describe two mushroom workers who developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to exposure to avian proteins found in poultry manure which was used in producing mushroom compost. Both workers were employed in the compost production area. Both presented with typical features of HP. Both workers had negative serological and precipitin studies to Apergillus fumigatus, Saccarhopolyspora rectivirgula and thermophilic actinomycetes but had positive responses to poultry antibodies. Neither was exposed to mushroom spores. Both workers required initial therapy with corticosteroids. Relocation with avoidance of further exposure resulted in complete cure in one worker and change in work practice with the use of personal protections equipment resulted in the second worker clinical stabilisation. These are the first reported cases of bird fanciers lung in mushroom workers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen
dc.subjectRESPIRATORY INFECTIONen
dc.subjectASPERGILLUSen
dc.subject.otherAGRICULTURAL EMPLOYEESen
dc.titleBird fancier's lung in mushroom workersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceUlsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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