Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559027
Title:
Medical education for the 21st century
Authors:
Murphy, JFA
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish Medical Journal
Issue Date:
Apr-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559027
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
In recent years many commentators have stated that undergraduate medical education needs to be radically altered to embrace the modern day demands and needs of patients. The current medical curriculum is still largely based the Flexner Report, which was published in the US in 1910 1 . Abraham Flexnerâ s document, which ran to 364 pages, was the first large scale attempt to standardise medical education. He divided the curriculum into 2 years of basic sciences based in universities, and 2 years of clinical training based in academic medical hospitals. Medical education was changed from an apprenticeship model to an academic model. Following publication of his report, medical training became more centralised and small rural medical schools were closed. In the new curriculum the emphasis was on basic sciences and clinical experience. Over the ensuing 100 years, scientific medicine and discovery flourished. These fundamental ideals have resulted in an overall consistent quality of medical care. The reforms, instituted by Flexner, were one of the factors that led to the doubling of human beingâ s lifespan during the 20 th century
Keywords:
MEDICAL EDUCATION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, JFAen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-06T11:59:56Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-06T11:59:56Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559027en
dc.descriptionIn recent years many commentators have stated that undergraduate medical education needs to be radically altered to embrace the modern day demands and needs of patients. The current medical curriculum is still largely based the Flexner Report, which was published in the US in 1910 1 . Abraham Flexnerâ s document, which ran to 364 pages, was the first large scale attempt to standardise medical education. He divided the curriculum into 2 years of basic sciences based in universities, and 2 years of clinical training based in academic medical hospitals. Medical education was changed from an apprenticeship model to an academic model. Following publication of his report, medical training became more centralised and small rural medical schools were closed. In the new curriculum the emphasis was on basic sciences and clinical experience. Over the ensuing 100 years, scientific medicine and discovery flourished. These fundamental ideals have resulted in an overall consistent quality of medical care. The reforms, instituted by Flexner, were one of the factors that led to the doubling of human beingâ s lifespan during the 20 th centuryen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen
dc.subjectMEDICAL EDUCATIONen
dc.titleMedical education for the 21st centuryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen
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