Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559023
Title:
How well do performance indicators perform?
Authors:
Murphy, JFA
Citation:
How well do performance indicators perform?, 107 (10):308 Ir Med J
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Nov-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559023
PubMed ID:
25551898
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The evolution of quality improvement has been driven by the need to reduce errors and raise the standard of medical care. The publication of 2 reports by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1999 and 2001 was the catalyst for change. The findings of both studies reported that there were preventable deaths in US hospitals and that the health system was failing to provide consistent high-quality care for all patients. The additional important step made by the IOM was the appreciation that errors were due to systems failure rather than individual mistakes. It tried to move away from blaming individual health care workers. This approach encouraged a more open, honest approach by hospitals when confronted with a medical mishap. It was appreciated that discussion and medical practice modification were the best way to prevent an error being repeated. In relation to clinical care, the principle of doing the right thing, at the right time, and in the right way was proposed. On foot of these deliberations the Joint Commission in the US in 2002 directed all accredited hospitals to collect performance data for patients with myocardial infarction, heart failure, pneumonia and pregnancy. This has now been further extended.
Keywords:
PERFORMANCE INDICATORS; QUALITY CONTROL
MeSH:
Hospital Administration; Humans; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Quality Assurance, Health Care
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, JFAen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-06T11:42:05Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-06T11:42:05Zen
dc.date.issued2014-11en
dc.identifier.citationHow well do performance indicators perform?, 107 (10):308 Ir Med Jen
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102en
dc.identifier.pmid25551898en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559023en
dc.descriptionThe evolution of quality improvement has been driven by the need to reduce errors and raise the standard of medical care. The publication of 2 reports by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1999 and 2001 was the catalyst for change. The findings of both studies reported that there were preventable deaths in US hospitals and that the health system was failing to provide consistent high-quality care for all patients. The additional important step made by the IOM was the appreciation that errors were due to systems failure rather than individual mistakes. It tried to move away from blaming individual health care workers. This approach encouraged a more open, honest approach by hospitals when confronted with a medical mishap. It was appreciated that discussion and medical practice modification were the best way to prevent an error being repeated. In relation to clinical care, the principle of doing the right thing, at the right time, and in the right way was proposed. On foot of these deliberations the Joint Commission in the US in 2002 directed all accredited hospitals to collect performance data for patients with myocardial infarction, heart failure, pneumonia and pregnancy. This has now been further extended.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen
dc.subjectPERFORMANCE INDICATORSen
dc.subjectQUALITY CONTROLen
dc.subject.meshHospital Administrationen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshOutcome Assessment (Health Care)en
dc.subject.meshQuality Assurance, Health Careen
dc.titleHow well do performance indicators perform?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen

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