Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559006
Title:
Sleep apnoea for the dental practitioner
Authors:
McAuliffe, Padraig; Purcell, Elaine
Publisher:
Journal of the Irish Dental Association
Journal:
Journal of the Irish Dental Association
Issue Date:
Apr-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/559006
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is characterised by repetitive, intermittent partial and/or complete obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. The aetiology of the condition is often related to the anatomy of the upper airway, whereby it is narrower than normal for some reason. For example, a large tongue and long, narrow soft palate make the airway naturally narrower, and fat deposits in the neck compress the airway from the outside (Table 1). Obstruction causes intermittent hypoxia, hypercapnia and disrupted sleep. The ‘fight or flight’ response is also triggered, with surges in catecholamines leading to sweating, tachycardia, elevated blood pressure and hyperglycaemia (Table 2). OSA affects about 1-2% of children and approximately 5% of adults. Incidence rises with advancing age and increasing body mass index (BMI). With an ageing population and rising obesity levels, it is therefore likely to become more common.
Keywords:
DENTAL CARE; SLEEP APNOEA
Local subject classification:
SLEEP DISORDERS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcAuliffe, Padraigen
dc.contributor.authorPurcell, Elaineen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-06T11:09:35Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-06T11:09:35Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/559006en
dc.descriptionObstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is characterised by repetitive, intermittent partial and/or complete obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. The aetiology of the condition is often related to the anatomy of the upper airway, whereby it is narrower than normal for some reason. For example, a large tongue and long, narrow soft palate make the airway naturally narrower, and fat deposits in the neck compress the airway from the outside (Table 1). Obstruction causes intermittent hypoxia, hypercapnia and disrupted sleep. The ‘fight or flight’ response is also triggered, with surges in catecholamines leading to sweating, tachycardia, elevated blood pressure and hyperglycaemia (Table 2). OSA affects about 1-2% of children and approximately 5% of adults. Incidence rises with advancing age and increasing body mass index (BMI). With an ageing population and rising obesity levels, it is therefore likely to become more common.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJournal of the Irish Dental Associationen
dc.subjectDENTAL CAREen
dc.subjectSLEEP APNOEAen
dc.subject.otherSLEEP DISORDERSen
dc.titleSleep apnoea for the dental practitioneren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Irish Dental Associationen
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